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Table of Contents


December 10, 2001 Issue

"You have to stop acting like you died. You didn't die. You have to live."
-- Howard Lutnick, "The Changed Man"

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FEATURES
Less: The New More
BY SARAH BERNARD AND RALPH GARDNER JR.
Last week, the experts told us we were in a recession -- tell us something we didn't know. Economic bad news has been exploding around the city since well before September 11, with layoffs, decimated 401Ks, and shrinking bonuses. As the city struggles to live with less, we asked our neighbors -- from bankers and lawyers to bartenders and actresses -- to tell us what they're doing to downsize their lives (giving up trainers, shrinks, Park Slope floor-throughs) and, temporarily, their dreams (changing careers, selling country houses, even moving back in with mom and dad). PLUS: Personal-finance strategies to help you deal with the downturn: Managing Your Mortgage and Real Estate: To Buy Or Not To Buy?

The Changed Man
BY MERYL GORDON
Before September 11, Cantor Fitzgerald CEO Howard Lutnick was notorious for his hard-nosed, what-have-you-done-for-me-lately style. Then the firm lost 657 employees -- including Lutnick's brother Gary -- and there he was on TV, making tearful, heartbreaking pledges that he'd devote his life and his company to supporting the bereaved families. That was just before he canceled the paychecks of missing employees who hadn't even been declared dead yet. So who is Howard Lutnick now? It's a complicated question. In this piece, he goes a long way toward answering it.

GOTHAM

DEPARTMENTS
Intelligencer
BY MARC S. MALKIN

This Media Life
BY MICHAEL WOLFF
In thrall to the new Republican archetype

The Bottom Line
BY JAMES J. CRAMER
How the Trading Goddess triumphed the last time we saw this kind of recession

The Naked City
BY AMY SOHN
One long-distance couple fights to stay together after September 11

MARKETPLACE
Best Bets
BY RIMA SUQI
Swarovski menorah candles, knit bags, and Christmas stockings for your pet
Plus: Best Bets Daily

Sales & Bargains
A page of sweet deals to make your holiday shopping more pleasurable
Plus: Daily Sales Update

Travel
BY TARA MANDY
New, improved cruise ships; great rates at hip hotels in Hawaii and here at home

THE CRITICS
Movies
BY PETER RAINER
Ocean's Eleven serves up the stars -- but not the thrills -- it promises

Books
BY DANIEL MENDELSOHN
Imraan Coovadia's debut novel shows his strength as a comic author; David M. Friedman offers a history of man's other best friend

Classical Music
PETER G. DAVIS
Robert White makes the most of mediocre new songs; a Wagner revival at the Met lacks complexity, but not crowd-friendliness

John Leonard's TV Notes

Theater
BY JOHN SIMON
Broadway Bash! lives up to its name; The Streets of New York fails to inspire

Art
BY MARK STEVENS
A new exhibit at the Guggenheim brings us the sensory magic of Brazil

The Underground Gourmet
BY ROBIN RAISFELD & ROB PATRONITE
Sampling the atypical Italian at William Mattiello's Via Emilia

CUE
Movies
Music & Nightlife
Theater
Art
Kids
Classical & Dance
The Mix

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