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Table of Contents


January 21, 2002 Issue

"His generosity is far beyond anything that has preceded it; those who were skeptical have been won over. "
-- Renée Fleming on Alberto Vilar, "The Music Man"

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FEATURES
The Royal Treatment
BY BETH LANDMAN KEIL
This is a moment when the best New Year's resolution might be: Relax. Let the wizards at New York's spas work their rejuvenating magic. From the misty oxygen facial at bliss to Elizabeth Arden's olive-oil pedicure, a complete guide to New York's best spas and treatments. Also: Alex Williams seeks out the city's most indulgent (don't say decadent) services. Sarah Bernard checks out havens where inner beauty is part of the regimen. Rima Suqi finds salons that will do the job -- for less. Plus, Shyama Patel spotlights spa products that go home with you, and Beth Landman Keil samples the spa cuisine at the city's best restaurants.

The Grann Alliance
BY MARION MANEKER
Penguin Putnam CEO Phyllis Grann was a publisher at the top of her game, beloved by the high-priced talent -- "Like Spielberg makes movies, she makes books," says Tom Clancy -- and respected for her tough-minded marketing savvy, when she abruptly resigned from the company in September. Her new job at Random House is tantalizingly vague. But many in her business are certain about one thing: This isn't the last plot twist.

The Music Man
BY ROBERT HILFERTY
Alberto Vilar made billions riding the high-tech wave, and now he's spending millions -- 225, so far -- on a personal crusade to keep opera and classical music alive (and to see his name on concert halls from the Met to Covent Garden to the Vienna State Opera). He's been accused of using his checkbook to push his own taste, but at least one admiring critic says he ought to have more say -- even if that means letting him onstage to take an opening-night bow with the rest of the divas.

GOTHAM

DEPARTMENTS
Intelligencer
BY MARC S. MALKIN

This Media Life
BY MICHAEL WOLFF
Adam Moss, the oldest living magazine wunderkind, in protective custody at the Times

The National Interest
BY TUCKER CARLSON
Could the voting public's happiness with the president actually hurt his party?

Strong Medicine
BY JOANNE KAUFMAN
How some patients repay (and royally) the doctors who saved their lives

MARKETPLACE
Sales & Bargains
A sampling of seasonal sales to help with your holiday shopping
Plus: Daily Sales Update

THE CRITICS
Movies
BY PETER RAINER
Todd Solondz's Storytelling shocks but doesn't convince; What Time Is It There? is too artsy for its own good

Books
BY DANIEL MENDELSOHN
Hollywood satirist Bruce Wagner goes Victorian in his latest L.A. story

Architecture
BY JOSEPH GIOVANNINI
The new Reuters building reflects -- and improves -- its Times Square environs

Theater
BY JOHN SIMON
Donna McKechnie and Barbara Cook master musical comedy with new solo performances

Classical Music
BY PETER G. DAVIS
The Gilbert & Sullivan Players triumph; Rachmaninoff Revisited upholds the legacy

TV Notes
BY JOHN LEONARD

Underground Gourmet
BY ROBIN RAISFELD & ROB PATRONITE
A taste of Provence at Paradou

CUE
Top Five
Movies
Music & Nightlife
Theater
Art
Kids
Classical & Dance
The Mix

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