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Table of Contents


May 6, 2002 Issue

"Everything they used to love her for, now they hate her for. I think she should start a new magazine called Jack."
-- Suzy Wetlaufer's sister Della Cushing, "An Affair to Remember"

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FEATURES
The Middle East War at Home
With Israel embroiled in an increasingly deadly conflict, a rising tide of anti-Semitism in Europe, and a perception of bias in the American media, American Jews have never felt so embattled. Amy Wilentz explicates the new mind-set. Craig Horowitz reports on how both sides plan to move forward in a world where trust has been exploded. On the left, Palestinians and Jews haven't given up hope of what they see as a just peace, reports Ariel Levy. But can you get there from here?

An Affair to Remember
BY LISA DEPAULO
Her officemates weren't exactly shocked when Harvard Business Review editor-in-chief Suzy Wetlaufer embarked on an ardent affair with Jack Welch, the married ex-CEO of General Electric. She'd enthusiastically shared details of earlier on-the-job romances -- including ones with Jacques Nasser, the former CEO of Ford, and a 22-year-old editorial assistant. But this time, when the dust settled, Suzy was out of work, and Jack's wife wanted out of their marriage -- to the tune of $450 million.

You Robert, Me Jane
BY MERYL GORDON
For almost a decade, Tribeca Film Center's Jane Rosenthal has been a powerhouse producer as well as Robert De Niro's professional better half -- the half, that is, that doesn't scare the hell out of people. Now, with the ambitious Tribeca Film Festival aimed to turn lower Manhattan into Cannes next week, she's trying to breathe new life (in the form of 40,000 visitors) into her beleaguered neighborhood. Can she pull it off? You talkin' to me?

GOTHAM
Death or Glory
When the stakes are high, British journalist Daniel Jeffreys always gets the story -- and he never lets the facts get in the way.
Liberty Denied
What's Inn for Next Season?
Q&A: Soul on Ice
When Chic Meets Sheik
Dance Fever (Ballet Style)

DEPARTMENTS
Letters

Intelligencer
BY MARC S. MALKIN

This Media Life
BY MICHAEL WOLFF
Wanted: A media strategy for Israel

The Bottom Line
BY JAMES J. CRAMER
One would expect to be the hero of his own memoir. But on rereading, this writer isn't so sure.

MARKETPLACE
Best Bets
BY RIMA SUQI
Gingham baby blankets, funky beach hats, and Bang & Olufsen's MP3 player
Plus: Best Bets Daily

Sales & Bargains
Oversize bags to carry you through the summer
Plus: Daily Sales Update

THE CRITICS
Movies
BY PETER RAINER
Tobey Maguire is appealingly human in Spider-Man; Woody Allen's latest fires off barbs at the movie business

Classical Music
BY PETER G. DAVIS
BAM brings Monteverdi back with eloquence; an(other) inspired Italian performance of Verdi's Requiem

John Leonard's TV Notes

Jazz
BY DAVID YAFFE
With new CDs, Cassandra Wilson and Norah Jones drift away from their roots

Theater
BY JOHN SIMON
Rebecca Gilman's utterly truthful Blue Surge; humor, not wit, in Morning's at Seven

Restaurants
BY ADAM PLATT
Enjoying tiny bites -- and feng shui fabulousness -- at Ten Vong's Meet

CUE
Top Five
Movies
Music & Nightlife
Theater
Art
Kids
Classical & Dance
The Mix

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