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Table of Contents


June 17, 2002 Issue

" There's a point where the sound on your stereo goes from being barely audible to very loud. MoMA's move to Queens has turned up the volume."
-- Rochelle Slovin, "MoMA Mia!"

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FEATURES
Loathe Thy Neighbor
BY ALEX WILLIAMS
You thought they were as extinct as the dinosaurs, those lucky stiffs living in palatial apartments while paying a quarter -- or a tenth -- of what you do. Think again. The days of rent regulation may be numbered, but there are plenty of well-heeled holdouts with fabulous deals, and with a sense of entitlement to go with them. (What self-respecting New Yorker pays retail?) As rents and co-op prices continue to soar, the power struggle -- and resentment -- between those who pay and those who pay through the nose has never been more intense.

Idol Humor
BY DAVID AMSDEN
For the better part of two decades, Denis Johnson has been idolized by other writers for his darkly humorous tales of addiction, deviance, and malaise. A "criminal hedonist" turned Christian, he has dodged celebrity, living in rural Idaho and declining tours and interviews. But with a new play, Shoppers Carried by Escalators Into the Flames, in previews in New York this week, and a conviction that God would find it amusing, he's ready to face his public.

MoMA Mia!
BY ALEXANDRA LANGE
The low-key, big-sky streetscape of Queens has doggedly defied hipness -- despite a few lonely outposts of cool like P.S.1 -- even as other boroughs (yes, the Bronx) became destinations. But with MoMA taking up temporary residence in Long Island City, and a vanguard of artists tired of paying Manhattan and Brooklyn rents, the buzz is building. Plus: A user's guide to the city's next serious art scene.

GOTHAM
The Skakel Curse
Michael Skakel is the quintessential Kennedy-style bad boy -- except for one thing: He couldn't keep his mouth shut.
Sexy Cause
Go Not So Directly to Jail
Shadows and Fog

DEPARTMENTS
Letters

Intelligencer
BY MARC S. MALKIN

This Media Life
BY MICHAEL WOLFF
Andrew Cuomo's jagged edges, which recall those of Bobby Kennedy, aren't cutting it this campaign season -- but maybe they should be

The Bottom Line
BY JAMES J. CRAMER
Why the little guy (that's anyone investing less than $10 million) can't count on the major firms, and whom he should turn to instead

The City Politic
BY MICHAEL TOMASKY
As Bloomberg inches closer to gaining control of our schools, the question remains: Can he save them?

MARKETPLACE
Best Bets
BY RIMA SUQI
Bathroom reading, emergency gear, and a new motorcycle for Dad's Day
Plus: Best Bets Daily

Sales & Bargains
Chic shades for slim budgets
Plus: Daily Sales Update

Travel
Fitness getaways, boutique hotels in D.C., and a cruise to the North Pole

THE CRITICS
Movies
BY PETER RAINER
Nicolas Cage can't save Windtalkers; Chris Rock's jokes bomb in Bad Company

Art
BY MARK STEVENS
Appealingly unslick shows of Claes Oldenburg, Ellsworth Kelly, and John Graham

Classical Music
BY PETER G. DAVIS
The New York Philharmonic says good-bye to Kurt Masur

Pop Music
BY ETHAN BROWN
David Bowie miscalculates with Heathen; Bryan Ferry delivers remakes with panache

Dance
BY TOBI TOBIAS
The School of the Paris Opera Ballet displays its distinctive refinement; SAB remembers Balanchine

Television
BY JOHN LEONARD
The triumphant second season of TNT's Witchblade; Anthony Michael Hall gets serious in Stephen King's Dead Zone

Restaurants
BY HAL RUBENSTEIN
Dismal décor -- but fabulous food -- at Montrachet; the unbeatable prix fixe at Compass

CUE
Top Five
Movies
Music & Nightlife
Theater
Art
Kids
Classical & Dance
The Mix

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