New York Magazine

Skip to content, or skip to search.

Skip to content, or skip to search.

Untitled Document

Table of Contents

October 15, 2007 Issue

Cover Story

The Rise of Mailerism

A dialogue with the American novelist about the religion he has embraced as his own, including God’s role as the artist of creation and the ongoing war between God and the Devil, with reincarnation as the Creator’s chief weapon and technology as the Devil’s.

Features

Snooze or Lose

Think twice before overscheduling your kids. New research reveals the cognitive toll that sleep deprivation takes on our overstimulated kids. And every fifteen minutes counts.

The Art Rush

Has Money Ruined Art? Even in the midst of this soul-crushing moment, when art and commerce are often confused for one another, great work is being done. Plus: The Artists Who Still Matter Living, Chelsea’s Subprime Moment, and more.

Intelligencer

It’s No Fun I.D.-ing Illegal Aliens

Spitzer has new ally in his controversial DMV proposal.

Playing a Queen Different From Being One

Or being DVD repairman.

Stay West, Young Museum Director

LACMA chief says nyet, Met.

Tom Ford Plays With Naked Men

Frisky, friendly at mag shoot.

More Masa For Less Moolah?

Sushi slinger eyes Soho spot.

It Happened Last Week

As Indian summer continued its extended run last week, some of the most popular kids in town found themselves getting the cold shoulder.

We’ve Mets the Enemy

The true fan appreciates the choke as much as the big win.

Nice Guys Finish...

The Knicks make us cringe now, but wait for the season to start.

He Built This Borough (Badly)

Why one of Brooklyn’s most prominent architects might lose his license.

Questioning Arizona

Are the Phoenix police cooperating as much as they can in the investigation of the Gotbaum death?

Columns

The Imperial City

The national impulse to squelch disagreeable viewpoints has reached a crazy tipping point. Why we need to relax.

Strategist

Best Bets

A full-size folding scooter and other ways to brighten your commute.

Shop News

After fifteen years in a tiny West Village outpost that was principally a workshop, jeweler Wendy Mink has moved to a 500-square-foot Lower East Side boutique.

Look Book

A chic former I-banker, enjoying her early retirement.

Restaurant Review

Laurent Tourondel embraces the local-ingredients craze at BLT Market.

In Season

The go-to stir-fried green at any decent Chinese-food feast, pea shoots have a tender texture and fresh, vegetal flavor that echoes the pea itself.

The Field of Football Bars

Football bars for every type of fan.

Restaurant Openings

Week of October 15, 2007: Cantina, Matilda, and Bun.

Rummaging

With New York’s flea markets disappearing, where to find great old stuff.

Real Estate

New Yorkers love their illicit washers and dryers.

Movers

It appears that Moby’s on the hunt for a more permanent nest: A source says he recently toured a $3.125 million two-bedroom loft on Great Jones Street.

Fame Slept Here

A house on the Heights comes up for rent.

Culture

The Happy Little Minimalist

The upbeat, creative existence of Nico Muhly, hipster composer.

The Movie Review

Great acting and directing (barely) lift We Own the Night out of the B-movie gutter.

Transmission: The Many Children of Joy Division

Sneakers, Raf Simons, Bono. Rarely has one tragic-depressive, post-punk singer had such long-lasting influence. On the eve of Anton Corbijn’s new film, Control, about Ian Curtis, front man for Joy Division, a look at what came after his suicide.

No Dummy: Emily Mortimer

In Lars and the Real Girl, Emily Mortimer plays the sister-in-law of a depressive shut-in who falls for a mail-order sex doll. She spoke to Logan Hill.

The TV Review

Angie Harmon plays yet another TV detective, this time wearing sneakers (and still looking good).

The Classical Music Review

The New York Philharmonic is too polished for its own good.

The Theater Review

Theresa Rebeck manages to make stamp collecting interesting in Mauritius.

A Five-Minute Call for the Undulating Curve of Shifting Expectations!

No art form lives and dies by word of mouth quite like the Broadway show. And this fall, you’ve likely heard that quite a few shows are supposed to be good.

The Book Review

Alice Sebold’s new novel is a rewind of her first book—all wound, no healing.

The Approval Matrix: Week of October 15, 2007

Our deliberately oversimplified guide to who falls where on our taste hierarchies.

The Week

A Rebel in Pigtails

Pippi Longstocking’s creator, at 100.

First Ladies

Three grandes dames (one an actual dame) give rare recitals.

The New Next Wave

The most promising plays from BAM’s Next Wave Festival ($20–$60; call 718-636-4100 for tickets and details).

Who’s a Bum?

Three chances to rebut The American Scholar’s recent dis of Brooklyn’s novelistic output.

Something Borrowed

Duchamp’s “ready made” gets a makeover—twice over.

Departments

Comments: October 15, 2007

Readers sound off on Bill Clinton, the Mets, and more.

Write a Letter to the Editor

Letters may be edited for space and clarity. Please include a daytime phone number.

Mail to
  • New York Media
  • 75 Varick Street
  • New York, NY 10013
Email
NYletters@newyorkmag.com
Advertising
Current Issue
Subscribe to New York
Subscribe

Give a Gift