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In Brief: Of Civil Wrongs & Rights: The Fred Korematsu Story

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Of Civil Wrongs & Rights: The Fred Korematsu Story (July 15; 10 to 11 p.m.; Channel 13) gives the P.O.V. treatment to a 23-year-old Japanese-American shipyard welder from Oakland, California, who refused to go into an internment camp in 1942 and, with the help of an ACLU lawyer, went all the way to the Supreme Court before losing his case but winning in the history books.

Queer Eye for the Straight Guy (July 15; 10 p.m. to midnight; Bravo) premieres with two episodes of a surreality series in which a fab five of gay experts on food, fashion, grooming, design, and nightlife move in on some straight zhlub and rearrange his packaging. The first two victims seem good-humored and even grateful. Still, isn’t this what Details magazine is supposed to do? And where are the experts to advise us how to behave with decency and principle?

The Six Wives of Henry VIII (July 16 and 23; 9 to 11 p.m.; Channel 13) are tarted up for public television with an overexcited historian, David Starkey, wandering through Tudor castles between beheaded spouses, who are themselves impersonated by lovely creatures in sumptuous gowns, speaking Latin. So this is what Protestantism looked like by the time it got to England.

American Justice: The Central Park Jogger (July 16; 9 to 10 p.m.; A&E) hasn’t tried hard enough to figure out why this series got this case so wrong the first time around.

Automatic Kalashnikov (July 21; 9 to 10:30 p.m.; Sundance) talks to Mikhail Kalashnikov himself, the Russian who created the weapon to kill Nazis in World War II and who turns out to be a much nicer guy than one would imagine from the more than 70 million AK-47s busy gunning down everybody from Afghan rebels to L.A. gangbangers.

Defending Our Kids: The Julie Posey Story (July 21; 9 to 11 p.m.; Lifetime) stars the always agreeable Annie Potts as a mother so enraged by a pedophile’s advances on her daughter in an online chat room that she helps police investigator Michael O’Keefe by posing on the Web as a lonely teen.


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