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Beauty's Best

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Allen Rosen
Mountainside Hospital; General Hospital Center at Passaic; Saint Barnabas Medical Center
37 North Fullerton Avenue, Montclair, N.J. (973-233-1933)

Allen Rosen spends half his time on aesthetic procedures such as breast augmentation, face-lifts, and liposuction and the other half on reconstructive work, from reshaping breasts post-mastectomy to healing burned children. (He is a former president of the American Cancer Society.) Many of Rosen’s patients are recent moms in for an “aug/pexy”—an implant and a lift to give volume and heft to post-nursing breasts.

Richard A. Skolnik
Mount Sinai Hospital
21 East 87th Street (212-722-1977)

Soap-opera stars and Broadway regulars come to Richard Skolnik for his 21 years of experience in the aesthetic-surgery business. Having done his training at Mount Sinai, he’s now the hospital’s chief of resident training in aesthetic surgery, which means that whenever he’s in the operating room, he’s teaching. Most of his practice is facial (eyelids, noses, full face-lifts), with some breast surgery, liposuction, and Botox treatments. He’s currently doing research using LEDs (light-emitting diodes) to combat wrinkles and pigmentation and as a general antiaging treatment that boosts the effects of topicals.

Mark R. Sultan
Beth Israel Medical Center; St. Luke’s— Roosevelt Hospital
1100 Park Avenue, at 89th Street (212-360-0700)

The chief of plastic surgery at Beth Israel and a plastic surgeon at St. Luke’s—Roosevelt, Mark Sultan is best known for his breast reconstructions. He favors the aggressive deep-plane face-lifts, which lift the muscle and fat along with the skin and elevate the forehead with minimal incisions. He also redistributes fat around the eyelids for rejuvenation, and specializes in endoscopic brow-lifts, which raise the area with minimal incisions.

Nicolas Tabbal
Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital
521 Park Avenue, at 60th Street (212-644-5800)

Rhinoplasty, the cornerstone of Nicolas Tabbal’s practice, is considered one of the most difficult cosmetic procedures to do well. It concerns skin, cartilage, and bone—three kinds of tissue. Also, the right (or wrong) nose job can totally change a person’s look. Not only is Tabbal regarded as one of the best in the city at sculpting beautiful noses, but he is the doctor to turn to if you’ve had a bad result at less-skilled hands.

Paul R. Weiss
Montefiore Medical Center; Beth Israel Medical Center
1049 Fifth Avenue, at 86th Street, Suite 2D (212-861-8000)

After 28 years in the business, Paul Weiss describes himself as “definitely not a plastic surgeon to the stars” and his practice as a “small shop that does custom work.” Known for lavishing his patients with personal attention—it’s Weiss, not his nurse, who makes the post-op check-up calls—he happily changes dressings and takes out sutures. Most procedures are done in his office, except for breast reduction, which requires in-patient hospital stays. His emphasis is on surgeries like endoscopic brow-lifts, but he won’t look down his nose at Botox shots or collagen injections.

Cosmetic Dermatologists

Robert M. Bernstein
New York—Presbyterian Hospital
125 East 63rd Street (212-826-2400)

Robert Bernstein’s practice is dedicated to hair restoration, from a balding pate to delicate eyebrow repair. He’s a pioneer of follicular-unit hair transplantation, in which hair is moved in its naturally occurring groups without a linear incision or scar; he rebuilds a hairline not with plugs but strand by strand, a painstaking procedure with the most natural-looking results.

Fredric Brandt
317 East 34th Street (212-889-7096)

Originally Miami-based, Fredric Brandt now spends one week a month in Manhattan (two weeks a month starting in November), so be prepared to wait in his office—assuming you get a coveted spot on his schedule. He specializes in sculpting the face and filling wrinkles, using Botox and collagens from bovine to human, and he participated in recent clinical trials for Restylane as well as for Dysport, which is similar to Botox. He has the full array of nonablative lasers (which don’t destroy the surface of the skin) and cares for skins that are acne-prone, aging, and everything in between, using prescriptions as well as his own product line, which is sold in Bergdorf Goodman, Bloomingdale’s, and Sephora. Rupert Everett and Lenny Kravitz are among his glowing boldfaces.


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