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Breakin' All The Rules on DVD

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Breakin’ All The Rules
Jamie Foxx, already ballyhooed for his performance as the womanizing and charming Ray Charles in the forthcoming biopic Ray, warmed up for that role by literally charming the pants off Gabrielle Union (pictured) in this sweet romantic comedy. PG-13; $24.96.

Bush’s Brain
This damning documentary nails Karl Rove by retracing his past political campaigns, but predictably casts Dubya as his unwitting pawn. PG-13; $19.99.

The Day After Tomorrow
Roland Emmerich destroys New York (and less important places, too) in this disaster flick that—let’s be honest, MoveOn—never should have been used as an excuse to discuss global warming. PG-13; $29.98.

Noi
Undoubtedly the most boring film ever made about an Icelandic albino. NR; $24.98.

Taxi: The Complete First Season
That seventies show, starring Judd Hirsch, Andy Kaufman, Danny DeVito, and others—inspired by a story by New York contributor Mark Jacobson. NR; $38.99.

Raising Helen
Another manipulative romantic comedy about a New York woman who can’t have it all—or can she? This one stars Kate Hudson. PG-13; $29.99.

I’m Not Scared
Gabriele Salvatores’s Italian tale mingles coming-of-age tropes and thriller scares. R; $29.99.

OUR PICK
When a brilliantly restored print of Gillo Pontecorvo’s 1965 epic The Battle of Algiers arrived earlier this year at Film Forum, New York’s Peter Rainer dubbed it “the most electrifyingly timely movie playing in New York.” A brutally realistic depiction of the Algerian uprising, the film’s “anatomy of terror remains unsurpassed—and, woefully, ever fresh,” wrote Rainer. Now a Criterion edition adds an authoritative array of extras, including Return to Algiers, the film Pontecorvo and his son made when they returned to Algeria in 1992; The Dictatorship of Truth, a documentary narrated by Edward Said; interviews about the film with directors Spike Lee, Mira Nair, Oliver Stone, and others; and three documentaries about the period. This is how classics deserve to be treated. Three discs; NR; $49.95.


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