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The Fog of War on DVD

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Robert McNamara in The Fog Of War.  

The Fog of War
Errol Morris’s documentary about Robert McNamara sees the mathematically minded military man as he “serves up his recollections, justifications, and mea culpas,” wrote New York’s Peter Rainer. “Most often, he comes across as Exhibit A in Morris’s latest metaphysical creepshow.” PG-13; $26.96.

Love! Valour! Compassion!
Terrence McNally’s drama has become a kind of Big Chill touchstone for gay men. R; $19.97.

In America
Jim Sheridan’s semi-autobiographical drama about an Irish family struggling to make it in New York “has moments of supernal lyricism,” wrote Peter Rainer. R; $27.98.

The Jetsons: The Complete First Season
Catch these reruns now—before a live-action remake ruins your fond memories. G; $64.92.

And Starring Pancho Villa As Himself
Antonio Banderas plays Villa in this sharp, self-aware HBO film about how the Mexican insurrectionary led an army (and a Hollywood camera crew) to war—during daylight hours only. NR; $19.97.

Torch Song Trilogy
Pass over the fake cross-dressers of Connie and Carla for the real-life female impersonation of Harvey Fierstein’s Tony-winning drama, adapted for the screen in 1988. R; $19.97.

OUR PICK
The occasional retrospective aside, American audiences haven’t had much chance to see Krzysztof Kieslowski’s intense 1988 features, A Short Film About Killing and A Short Film About Love. Fortunately, new editions revive the dark Polish siblings—which aren’t so short after all, being the only two chapters of the filmmaker’s “Decalogue” television series expanded to feature length. Inspired by the Ten Commandments and set in a bleak and barren Warsaw, these films tackle everyone’s favorite decrees: “Thou shalt not kill” and “Thou shalt not commit adultery.” Hardly moralistic, at least in any conventional sense, they’re infused with the grim ambiguity and grit that would later make Kieslowski’s Red, White, and Blue films such crossover successes. NR; $29.95 each. Extras: trailers; cast and crew interviews; the short 1978 documentary A Night Porter’s Point of View (packaged with Killing); the 1966 short Tramway (packaged with Love).


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