Skip to content, or skip to search.

Skip to content, or skip to search.

Let the Games Continue

ShareThis

With a pardonable sense of exasperation, New Yorkers did their best to follow a stadium–cum–Olympic-bid drama that had more false endings than a Mahler symphony. No sooner was the West Side stadium thrust into the world of unbeing—and with it, seemingly, the city’s prospects for hosting the 2012 Olympics—than two other stadiums (stadia?) leaped into potentiality. “Queens, glorious Queens!” was the tune that Mayor Bloomberg was singing as plans for a new Mets ballpark—and suitable Olympic venue—were hastily unveiled. “We love the Bronx!” exclaimed George Steinbrenner when, only three days later, the Yankees announced their plans to build a new stadium. While Yank fans seemed to like the faux-historical design, which hearkened back to the twenties, Times architecture critic Nicolai Ouroussoff quickly denounced it as being “more suited to Las Vegas than to the Bronx.” Meanwhile, “Columnist of the Year” Andrea Peyser was using her rhetorical powers to whip Post readers into a frenzy of indignation over the Michael Jackson verdict, not an especially difficult task. Manhattan’s luncheon set was shaken by rumors that Swifty’s had filed for Chapter 11, but a measure of calm was restored by the news that Harry Cipriani, which was expected to be permanently shuttered, would likely reopen in the fall. The oppressive heat got the better of students at un-air-conditioned public schools. “I have children who are passing out,” said one teacher. “This is not education.” An aide to Freddy Ferrer denied that the mayoral candidate planned to lose his Groucho-like mustache. (Not even if someone says the secret woid?) And Eartha Kitt kept her composure when her microphone went dead during a song at the Café Carlyle, profiting from the interruption by hawking a copy of her autobiography that she happened to have on hand. All the while, the city braced for the advent of the Reverend Billy Graham, who is to hold a three-day outdoor revival in Flushing. His followers hope that the event will trigger a spiritual awakening in New York, but the prospect seems unlikely.


Related:

Advertising
Current Issue
Subscribe to New York
Subscribe

Give a Gift

Advertising