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Forgive and Receive

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It was a week of mercy and forgiveness, inspired by the genuinely noble example of Victoria Ruvolo. This Long Island woman, maimed last fall when a frozen turkey came crashing through the windshield of her car, forgave the teenager who tossed the missile, Ryan Cushing, and asked the judge sentencing him to be lenient. As the “turkey teen” sobbed out an apology, Ms. Ruvolo cradled his head, stroked his face, and said, “It’s okay, it’s okay, I just want you to make your life the best it can be.” A wave of grace seemed to wash across the region. Russell Crowe, who himself stands accused of launching a telephone at the head of Mercer Hotel clerk Nestor Estrada, was reported by a London tabloid to be so contrite that he was ready to pay $11 million in atonement to his alleged victim (although his lawyer denied it). Perhaps Crowe hoped Estrada would cradle him and say, “It’s okay, it’s okay,” or at least decline to testify at his assault trial. In a more selfless act of charity, George Clooney was observed bestowing a handsome benefaction on a panhandler while strolling with his business partner, Rande Gerber, on Madison Avenue. Laura DeFilippo, the alleged lover of St. Patrick’s “randy rector,” Msgr. Eugene Clark, was seen ducking into her girlhood Bronx parish church for a few moments, doubtless to ask God to take pity on her, a sinner. (No word on whether violations of the Sixth Commandment were alluded to in her prayers.) Bucking the clemency trend, the servants at Martha Stewart’s Bedford estate were in no mood to forgive their mistress for allegedly canceling the Poland Spring contract and thereby depriving them of free water—even as she bought an Aston Martin and a French bulldog, one of them complained, for herself. On the East End of Long Island, by contrast, hundreds of Hamptons houseguests were doing their best to forgive their hosts’ décor, as the precious remainder of the season drew to a close.


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