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Perfect Catch

Space-age technology or basic leather: Which baseball glove is the best fit for your own spring training?

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Wilson A3000, $400
Light and flexible, good for infield and out alike. The high-tech design is stronger and more comfortable. Luxe, pro-level materials jack up the price. For equipment snobs only (The Sports Authority, 57 W. 57th St., nr. Sixth Ave.; 212-355-6430).







Nokona AMG, $175
The classic. One whiff of the hand-sewn kangaroo leather will take you back to Little League days. Requires some breaking in, but it will just get better every spring (T&C Sports World, 3555 Victory Blvd., nr. Travis Ave., Staten Island; 718-698-3700).






Nike Pro Gold, $150
The shape and weight are perfectly fine, but the ostentatious Swoosh logo on the back and faux-fur lining (baseball is a summer sport) make this glove too pretentious for its own good (Modells.com for store locations).








Easton Stealth, $110
A high-tech Kevlar exterior doesn’t add any romance, but the Stealth is surprisingly functional. The overstylized ridged plastic piece on the top of the glove will drive your index finger insane (The Sports Authority).








Akadema APX, $99
For the serious outfielder. This glove is light, generously sized, and designed to mimic the preferred pincerlike hand positioning of major-league fly-shaggers (Park View Sports, 5973 Broadway, at 242nd St., the Bronx; 718-549-4400).








Rawlings Silverback, $90
Designed specifically for the heavier ball in softball, this glove is stiffer, tougher to break in, and weightier than its baseball counterparts. Silver logo started to wear off almost immediately—not a good sign (Modells.com for store locations).








Mizuno GTF Fourteen-Inch, $70
An outfielder’s glove: The awkward angle and wide span (fourteen inches) make it unwieldy for anything but flies and drives. (Paragon Sporting Goods, 867 Broadway, at 18th St.; 212-255-8036.)








DeMarini A0525, $60
The best option for the casual twice-a-year player. Supple from the start, and the long fingers and wide pocket make it useful for all types of fielding. (Paragon Sporting Goods.)








Rawlings Players Series, $30
Stiff and obviously made from less-than-stellar materials, this glove seems likely to fall apart before you even get it broken in. For emergency purchase only (Modells.com for store locations).








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