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Eighties Edition: Don't Stop Believin'

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Forget tech fabrics, boot-cuts, and delicate beads -- we're going back to leg warmers, skinny ties, and Huey Lewis. The industry's young designers are recalling their favorite excesses from the greed decade as next season's look; Jeremy Scott, the 26-year-old designer darling of the moment, tells Harper's Bazaar that the Reagan years were "the last time fashion was truly fashionable." Scott provoked gasps at the European spring shows with his pastel chiffons, Flashdance-inspired sweatshirts, and shoulder pads worthy of Krystle Carrington. Stella McCartney, another eighties adolescent turned fashion wunderkind, pays tribute to the Thatcher era by draping thick gold chains as a halter and over suede boots in her spring Chloé collection. The decade's darkest moment is revived in Emanuel Ungaro's spring collection of tight-fitting acid-wash jeans complete with ankle slits ($890) and Michael Kors's spot-bleached jeans for Celine ($550). Making a run on well-toned legs, fishnet stockings are becoming the status accessory of choice, with Prada going standard French-maid chic and Gucci layering them over hot-pink tights -- very "Like a Virgin." Both Grand Royal and Gucci trumpeted the return of the mullet a few seasons back; now the publication of The Mullet: Hairstyle of the Gods (Bloomsbury Publishing; $14.95) confirms that the Kajagoogoo coif is no longer just a punch line. At the East Village's Wonder Bar, the dance floor is a tangle of Patrick Swayze-style bi-level manes. And for those who really want to get back to their junior-high roots, the Roxy's weekly roller-rink party has become a hotbed of hipsters -- even if, in one blessed bit of resistance, REO Speedwagon has been replaced with the Basement Jaxx.


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