New York Magazine

Skip to content, or skip to search.

Skip to content, or skip to search.

Bomber jackets and buttons are back;
Fashion Week's fave freebies

ShareThis

Button Up
Remember those little round pins that adorned lapels in the mid-eighties, announcing the name of a favorite band or social slogan, like eat the rich? Along with other accoutrements of the decade -- slouch boots and miniskirts -- they're back. During Fashion Week, they were spotted on a number of Earl Jean jackets and, in a strange juxtaposition of Reagan-era protest and post-millennial consumerism, at least one Prada bag. The most prized pins were the ones packaged with the September issue of The Face -- but only in the U.K., so anyone wearing one was also flaunting a recent trip to London. Here in New York, you can find the buttons on St. Marks Place -- exactly where they were the first time around.
NANCY MACDONELL SMITH

Bombers Away
As the baseball season heats up and the theater season gets under way, the satin bomber jacket is no longer just for the Mets dugout or the Cabaret cast. Japanese label Hysteric Glamour's send-up of the jacket was spotted on a Bazaar editor during Fashion Week. The ushers at Daryl K's show wore her black silk bomber ($470) and, thanks to Janet Jackson- style headsets, looked like a pack of play producers. Come spring, candy-colored coats from Marc Jacobs and Jill Stuart will hit the shelves. Of course, you could always just pick one up at those cheesy shops near the TKTS stand.
KRISTINA RICHARDS

Free Association
With its all-you-can-eat backstage sushi platters, champagne, and product handouts, Fashion Week is a free-for-all for moochy models. This season, they raked in a pile of plunder: At Tuleh, they left in the same pairs of custom-designed Christian Louboutin boots they wore on the runway; at Benjamin Cho, they made off with handcrafted leather feather pendants; Wink's Wynn Smith treated each to an entire outfit; and Karen Elson was heard gushing about her new caramel leather handbag courtesy of Helmut Lang. Those who didn't receive loot took matters into their own hands: One moody male model left the Imitation of Christ show with the most coveted relic -- a wrist bandage embroidered with blood-red thread.
JOEL FERREE


Related:

Advertising
Current Issue
Subscribe to New York
Subscribe

Give a Gift

Advertising