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How to Fully Enjoy Mets vs. Yankees

Invade the enemy's ballpark

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DON’T PANIC (YET) ABOUT GETTING TICKETS.
The first three-game set starts June 25 at Yankee Stadium, the second on July 2 at Shea. The games are, of course, sold out, but tickets can be found at StubHub.com, where the selection is plentiful. Prices start around $35 for bleachers.

DO LET ALCOHOL DETERMINE YOUR MODE OF TRANSPORTATION.
The NY Waterway ferry takes about as long as the subway (allow two hours, for peace of mind), but the ferry sells drinks. Make sure to reserve a seat (800-53-FERRY).

DO ATTEMPT ALTERNATIVE PARKING STRATEGIES.
Driving to Yankee Stadium is madness, but Shea is doable, says Phil Hartman, a Mets devotee. He avoids the lots, though: “Our favorite thing is to navigate the back roads of Corona, park about ten blocks from the stadium, eat at an Ecuadoran restaurant, and then walk to the game. On the way back, stop at the Ice King of Corona on 108th Street for amazing Italian ice.”

DON’T BRING A BAG.
Nothing larger than a purse gets into Yankee Stadium, and the only place to check a bag is at the bowling alley across the street. Shea is more lenient, but you’ll still be standing in a security line for 40 minutes.

DO WANDER AFIELD FOR FOOD.
If the hot dog–Bud Light routine gets old, Yankee Stadium has Chinese pickings in the food court and an outdoor café along the right-field line with swankier beer and sit-down tables. Shea just set up a new kids’ food booth on the right-field line with pizza by the slice and chicken nuggets, and behind home plate there’s a Japanese booth and a kosher stand with Hebrew National hot dogs and knishes (closed for Friday night and Saturday day games).

DON’T SIT TIGHT.
If better seats somehow open up, get creative with the ushers. “Buy some popcorn so it looks like you can’t get your ticket and yell, ‘I’m coming, Dad!,’ ” says Chris O’Hara, a Yankees fan. “Works every time.” One Mets fan warns: “The ushers at Shea are ancient; they don’t like to be snuck around. You’ve got to talk to them, and by talking, I mean thigh-level passing of green.”


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