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The Poll Explained

Single in the Suburbs

Tales from the Front

Candace Bushnell at 43

15 Dates Under $60

Goodbye, Mr. Big


PLUS


Strictly Personals

Pickup Bars

Amy Sohn's Naked City





Nightlife & Singles
Raw poll questions and results in PDF format
 

Survey Results  Your Turn to Vote! NYers Quoted                         
 

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1. How hard is it to date in NY?
  Easy Difficult
Men 52% 40%
Women 36% 56%
 

The older you get, the harder it gets. 62% of older women answered difficult.

Gays and lesbian singles find dating easier: 60% answered "easy" compared to 42% of straight singles.

If you're a professional, gender makes an even bigger difference. 63% of professional men find it easy to date while only 34% of the women do. This difference doesn't exist among non-professionals

 

2. How many dates did you go on this year?
0 10%
1-10 55%
100+     3%
 
Singles are going on fewer dates now than they were in 1998.

While the percentage of singles who didn't date at all has remained constant since 1988, the percentage of singles who have gone on less than 10 dates has risen from 40 % to 55%.

The percentage of singles who have gone on more than 50 dates has fallen from 19% to 6% since 1998.
 


3. What's your romantic status?
69% : not in a serious, committed relationship
31% : in a serious relationship for less than 2 years
 
New Yorkers are less afraid of being single than shows like Sex and the City would have us believe.

21% of uncommitted singles say they are "happily single and not dating"; only 8% say they are panicking.

Older women are most likely to be happily single (19%), but they're also most panicked (9%).
 


4. Do you date for fun or because you want a relationship?
  Fun Relationship
Men 33% 42%
Women 29% 51%
 

5. Where do you go to meet "your type"?
Going out with friends 35%
Parties 23%
Clubs     22%
Bars     22%
Work     20%
Cultural Events     15%
Professional Connections     8%
Places of Worship     8%
Lectures     6%
Gym     6%
Internet     5%
Blind Dates     4%
School     4%
Jdate/Singles Dating Sites     2%
 

The longer people live in the city, the more likely they are to go to clubs to meet people: 27% of respondents who have lived here ten years or longer say they look for partners at clubs, versus 10% of those who've been here two years or less.

Gay and lesbian singles are more likely than straights to say that they look for potential partners at "cultural events" (23% gays to 14% straights), "lectures" (15% gays to 5% straights) and "the gym" (11% gays to 5% straights).

 

6. What are you looking for when you date?
  Fun Relationship
Men 33% 42%
Women 29% 51%
 

7. What's qualities are most important to you in a partner?
* Only those qualities identified as "very significant" counted.

 
% Men
1998
% Men
New
% Women
1998
% Women
New
Personality
89
98
93
99
Values
8
87
87
96
Sense of Humor
81
91
88
91
Education
74
75
84
88
Looks
65
74
47
59
Body
65
42
47
33
Job
60
44
82
76
Attire
58
72
66
58
Desire for Family
42
49
51
66
Income
41
23
58
64
Apartment
32
30
47
49
Ethnicity
31
18
38
39
Religion
27
27
36
24

 

Looks are "highly important" for 74% of men, 59% of women

Income is "highly important" for 64% of women, 23% of men.

Ethnicity is the least significant factor, with 24% of women and 18% rating it as highly important.

New Yorkers tend to care more about apartments than religion: 40% said that a potential partner's apartment was a "highly important" factor for them; only 33% said the same for religion.

Significantly fewer men listed "body" as highly important this time (42% compared to 65% in 1998) but a highter percentage of men said looks were important (74% compared to 65% in 1998).

For both sexes, the importance of their partners job dropped since 1998.

 

8. New York singles have no problems dating someone who makes more money than them.
 
Very Comfortable  72%
Uncomfortable     4%
 

9. What is more important to you: your job or a relationship?
 
1998
Current
MEN    
Job
41%
50%
Relationship
49%
43%
WOMEN
 
Job
46%
55%
Relationship
43%
58%

 

Regardless of gender, New York singles care more about their jobs - and less about relationships - than they did in 1998.

 

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Who Counted?
Six hundred and nine New York City singles between the ages of 21 and 40 were surveyed January 8-12 by Global Strategy Group, Inc. Those identified as being in a relationship have been in one for less than two years. The margin of error is +/- 4 percent. The 1998 survey was also of New York singles between the ages of 21 and 40.