4 of 7

The Least Expensive

Price: $609,000
392 Audubon Avenue
This eighteen-foot-wide brick three-story is an estate sale; the previous owners lived there for four decades. It’ll need a major refresh and doesn’t have a backyard, but it isn’t a shell and, according to StreetEasy, is the most affordable single-family house in the borough. The first floor is zoned for a storefront.
Broker: Svetlana Choi, Bellmarc Realty

Photo: Michelle Feffer/New York Magazine

The Most Expensive

Price: $90 Million
4 East 80th Street
This French Gothic 19,950-square-foot mansion was completed in 1916 by five-and-ten king Frank Woolworth for his daughter. Inside, it’s the Gilded Age run amok, with a grand staircase, intricate moldings, coffered ceilings, mosaic floors, eight woodburning fireplaces, and other king-of-the-world details intact.
Broker: Paula Del Nunzio, Brown Harris Stevens

Photo: Courtesy of the Broker

The Quaintest

Price: $799,000
10 Sylvan Terrace
Built in 1882, this landmarked three-bedroom wood-frame house has five fireplaces and a backyard just big enough for a table and two chairs. Because Sylvan Terrace’s uniform look makes it popular with filmmakers—Boardwalk Empire has shot there—the fees they pay for tapings are used to defray taxes, meaning that the annual nut for this house is just $2,088.
Broker: Moises Santana, Halstead Property.

Photo: Courtesy of the Broker

The Oldest

Price: $5.4 Million
27 Harrison Street
The mostly original façade and upstairs window frames show off this Federal-style townhouse’s 1796 roots, though inside, all but a few beams have been hidden by renovations. It was built by John McComb, who was the first New York starchitect (he built Gracie Mansion and City Hall). Originally on Washington Street, the 4,000-square-foot house was moved to its present site when Independence Plaza was built in the early seventies.
Brokers: Patrick Lilly and Martin Eiden, the Corcoran Group

Photo: Michelle Feffer/New York Magazine

The Greenest

Price: $40 Million
34 East 62nd Street
It’s not built yet, but this four-bedroom is planned for the notorious parcel that once held physician Nicholas Bartha’s house before he blew it up during contentious divorce proceedings in 2006. Once built, it will be one of the first LEED-certified townhouses in the city, with a geothermal well to run the HVAC system.
Brokers: Lisa Verdi and Paige Nelson, Sotheby’s International Realty

Photo: Courtesy of the Broker

The Skinniest

Price: $3.495 Million
75 1/2 Bedford Street
A stop on many Greenwich Village walking tours, this house has an exceedingly lively history despite its limitations as living space. It’s just 9.5 feet wide, which (after you subtract the stairwell) makes for some oddly proportioned, if charming, rooms. They’ve been occupied by four famous residents: the poet Edna St. Vincent Millay, Margaret Mead, John Barrymore, and Cary Grant.
Brokers: Bo Poulsen, Vladimir Luzader and Robert Treanor, Town Residential

Photo: Michelle Feffer/New York Magazine; Bettmann/Corbis (Millay); Everett Collection (Grant)

The Only Completely Freestanding Mansion

Price: $14.95 Million
351 Riverside Drive
Freestanding single-family houses—those with exposures on all sides—are truly rare in Manhattan. At the moment, it appears that there’s only one on the market: the Schinasi Mansion on the Upper West Side, named after the tobacco trader who commissioned it in 1907. (There’s another listing downtown, 38 Bethune, that’s fully detached, but one wall is mere inches from its neighbor.) The Schinasi house is just ridiculously royal: twelve bedrooms, eleven baths, solid-oak banisters that are nearly a foot wide. Down below street level, there’s a remnant of a tunnel that once led to the Hudson River and may have been used to haul in hooch during Prohibition.
Broker: Tod Mercy, the Corcoran Group

Photo: Courtesy of the Broker

Jerome Allen (left) Hylan Boulevard and Lipsett Avenue, Staten Island. On April 26, 2005, during a daily sunset ride near his home, Allen was struck from behind by a Lexus SUV. He was a member of the Staten Island Bicycle Association.

Eric Ng West Side Highway and Clarkson Street. On December 1, 2006, Ng was struck by a BMW on the Hudson River Park bikeway. According to police, the driver reached 60 mph.

Carl Henry Nacht (left) West Side Highway and 38th Street. After dinner on June 22, 2006, Nacht, a doctor who often cycled to make house calls to his elderly patients, was hit by an NYPD tow truck crossing the Hudson River Park bikeway.

Shamar Porter Linden Boulevard near Williams Avenue, East New York. On August 5, 2006, Porter’s Little League team won its playoff game. He was struck by a minivan after leaving the field.

Reginald Chan (left) Third Avenue and 17th Street. On September 15, 2006, Chan was hit by a flatbed tow truck while making a delivery of Chinese food.

Brandie Bailey Houston and Essex Streets. On May 8, 2005, Bailey was struck by a private sanitation truck while on her way home to Williamsburg after waitressing at the West Village restaurant Red Bamboo. Bailey was a regular at CBGB, where a memorial was held in her honor.

Craig Murphey (left) Ten Eyck Street and Union Avenue, Williamsburg. Early in the morning of October 18, 2007, Murphey was biking home from escorting his date to her South Williamsburg apartment. According to police reports, Murphey attempted to outrun a gas truck turning left on Ten Eyck Street. His pelvis shattered on impact, and he was pronounced dead at the scene. In his honor, over 40 friends have since received tattoos that read BE BETTER.

Frank C. Simpson Linden Boulevard near 175th Street, St. Albans. Simpson, a janitor returning from the evening shift at a Con Edison facility, was hit by a Dodge Stratus on November 9, 2006.

Jose Mora (left) North Conduit and McKinley Avenues, Cypress Hills. On September 4, 2006, 11-year-old Mora was on his way to the barber for a back-to-school haircut; that week, he was to start the sixth grade at nearby Junior High School 302. He was struck by a Honda while walking his bike across an intersection.

Jonathan Neese South 4th Street and Roebling Street, Williamsburg. On August 12, 2006, Neese, a bike messenger known as “Bronx Jon,” was struck by a livery cab while cycling from Brooklyn to Manhattan.

Sam Khaled Hindy (left) Base of the Manhattan Bridge. On November 16, 2007, Hindy was run over after mistakenly entering a Manhattan Bridge lane reserved for cars.

Habian Rodriguez Main Street and Horace Harding Expressway, Flushing. On September 1, 2007, Rodriguez collided with a city bus and died 30 minutes later.

Elizabeth Padilla (left) Fifth Avenue and Prospect Place, Park Slope. Commuting to the Brooklyn Bar Association on June 9, 2005, Padilla swerved to avoid the open door of a parked P.C. Richard’s truck. She lost control of her bike and fell underneath the wheels of an ice-cream delivery truck.

Juan Luis Solis East Gun Hill Road and Bouck Avenue, the Bronx. Attempting to pass a double-parked car on June 22, 2007, Solis was struck by a box truck and died of severe head trauma. The truck did not stop.

Jeffrey Moore (left) Chauncey Street and Rockaway Avenue, Bed-Stuy. According to witnesses, on May 29, 2007, Moore was run over (twice) by his girlfriend Jeanine Harrington. She was indicted on charges of murder and criminal possession of a weapon (her Nissan Pathfinder).

Derek Lake Houston Street and La Guardia Place. On June 26, 2006, Lake reportedly skidded on a steel construction plate and was crushed underneath the wheels of a passing truck.

Elijah Armand Wrancher (left) Springfield Boulevard and 130th Avenue, Springfield Gardens. On August 28, 2007, 12-year-old Wrancher attempted to ride his bicycle while holding onto a moving truck. He lost his grip and fell under the truck’s rear wheel.

David Smith Sixth Avenue and 36th Street. On December 5, 2007, Smith was biking up Sixth Avenue when the passenger-side door of a parked pickup truck opened unexpectedly. He was knocked into the path of an oncoming truck.

Anthony Delgado (left) Palmetto Street and Central Avenue, Bushwick. Shortly after midnight on April 29, 2007, 13-year-old Delgado borrowed a bike to head home from his friend’s baptism party. As he crossed the intersection, he was struck by an SUV.

Carolina Hernandez 57th Avenue and Junction Boulevard, Elmhurst. On August 16, 2007, Hernandez was riding to a mall when she was struck and killed by a Chevy truck. The driver pled guilty to driving with a suspended license.

Anthony Delgado (left) Palmetto Street and Central Avenue, Bushwick. Shortly after midnight on April 29, 2007, 13-year-old Delgado borrowed a bike to head home from his friend’s baptism party. As he crossed the intersection, he was struck by an SUV.

Carolina Hernandez 57th Avenue and Junction Boulevard, Elmhurst. On August 16, 2007, Hernandez was riding to a mall when she was struck and killed by a Chevy truck. The driver pled guilty to driving with a suspended license.

Anthony Delgado (left) Palmetto Street and Central Avenue, Bushwick. Shortly after midnight on April 29, 2007, 13-year-old Delgado borrowed a bike to head home from his friend’s baptism party. As he crossed the intersection, he was struck by an SUV.

Carolina Hernandez 57th Avenue and Junction Boulevard, Elmhurst. On August 16, 2007, Hernandez was riding to a mall when she was struck and killed by a Chevy truck. The driver pled guilty to driving with a suspended license.

Anthony Delgado (left) Palmetto Street and Central Avenue, Bushwick. Shortly after midnight on April 29, 2007, 13-year-old Delgado borrowed a bike to head home from his friend’s baptism party. As he crossed the intersection, he was struck by an SUV.

Carolina Hernandez 57th Avenue and Junction Boulevard, Elmhurst. On August 16, 2007, Hernandez was riding to a mall when she was struck and killed by a Chevy truck. The driver pled guilty to driving with a suspended license.

Fall Fashion Features

The Beefcake in the Backcourt
Big, fake, and fully able to outshine its surroundings.Big, fake, and fully able to outshine its surroundings.

 

The Beefcake in the Backcourt
Big, fake, and fully able to outshine its surroundings.Big, fake, and fully able to outshine its surroundings.
Advertising