Skip to content, or skip to search.

Skip to content, or skip to search.

Wood vs. Gas vs. Stove

A battle of the fireboxes.


Wood-Burning Fireplace

The heat:
Wood fires can reach 1,100 degrees, but as much as 90 percent of the warmth shoots up the chimney.

Coziness:
Loads of snap-and-crackle swagger.

Efficiency:
Ten to 25 percent efficient, by most estimates.

Cleanliness:
Nine to ten teaspoons of soot emitted per hour.

Expense:
A face cord of wood—48 bundles, a typical winter’s worth—runs $250 to $325.



Gas Fireplace

The heat:
Much better at directing heat into the room. Even the glass safety panels can top 1,000 degrees.

Coziness:
Modern and effortless, but can give off a whiff of compromise.

Efficiency:
Varies by model: 58 to 99 percent efficient, per the Hearth, Patio and Barbecue Association.

Cleanliness:
Essentially spotless.

Expense:
About $200 for 100 hours using propane; $40 for 100 hours of natural gas. (Based on a 1,200-square-foot apartment.)



Wood Stove

The heat:
Around 1,100 degrees, venting much less heat to the outside than an open flue would.

Coziness:
Depending on the style, anything from Gstaad ski chalet to log-cabin chic.

Efficiency:
About 60 to 80 percent efficient, per energy.gov, for modern, EPA-approved models.

Cleanliness:
Very little soot. New ones emit six grams per hour.

Expense:
Requires a third less wood than an open hearth: figure $165 to $215 per season.


Related:

Advertising
Current Issue
Subscribe to New York
Subscribe

Give a Gift

Advertising