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Market Research: Gyms

They’re a major selling point— but some buildings’ gyms sell a bit harder than others.

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101 Warren Street
7,000 square feet. Fee to join: None. Residents only; no guests. Apartment prices from $1.2 million to $16 million.
At this new, over-the-top Tribeca building, the gym is supposed to evoke a spa weekend getaway (which explains the bank of pine trees and the garden maze). The fitness center, co-designed by Buns of Steel co-author Liz Neporent, includes deluxe features like a sun terrace and a yoga and Pilates studio. In keeping with the vogue for hotel-style offerings, residents can order spa services—massages and such—in their apartments, in the manner of room service.


350 West 42nd Street
8,200 square feet. Fee to join: None. Residents only; no guests. Apartment prices from $600,000.
A New-Agey “holistic” gym on three high floors has 360-degree views of the Hudson River and midtown. An exceptional focus on calming spa services (sun terrace, hot tub, yoga classes, shiatsu, aromatherapy) in addition to the usual elliptical-training machines may stem from its high-impact location: You will no doubt need to wind down after walking home through the throngs in Times Square.


330 East 38th Street
30,000 square feet, including pool and deck. Fee to join: None. Open to residents and guests. Apartment prices from approximately $1 million.
This Murray Hill tower, right on the East River, is an encyclopedia of eighties condo-design tackiness. But even if you’re not crazy about its looks, the gym is a huge perk. An immense fitness area takes up the building’s entire fourth floor, the indoor Olympic-size swimming pool is surrounded by windows, and an 800-foot running track loops around the building.


99 Gold Street
2,225 square feet, including basketball court. Fee to join: None. Open to residents and guests. Apartment prices from $535,000.
Great for a pickup game of hoops, serviceable for everything else: The basketball court is non-regulation size, and the two workout rooms behind one of the baskets are small but well equipped. There’s also a rec-room-like area with a volleyball net and a Ping-Pong table, should you prefer your workouts to take place without actual, y’know, running.


4-74 48th Avenue, Long Island City
1,600 square feet. Fee to join: None. Open to residents and guests. Apartment prices from $315,000.
This gym has no windows, but it does have the right complement of machines plus a nice little selection of weekly classes (yoga, belly dancing). The feature worth coveting, though, is the pair of full-size tennis courts on the sixth-floor terrace, where you can practice your serve (and hone your U.S. Open fantasies) with a view of the Manhattan skyline.


66 Overlook Terrace
600 square feet. Fee to join: $225 for a couple per year, $175 for a single per year. Open to residents and guests. Apartment prices from $335,000.
The useful if dank gym in Washington Heights (it’s near 188th Street) has the basics—treadmills, stationary bikes, a few weight machines. It also has two high windows, with an air conditioner jammed into one. It’ll certainly serve for a workout, and you can always duck out to nearby Fort Tryon Park for a jog if it’s too claustrophobic. Don’t hit your head on the pipes as you go.


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