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Devils on Horseback

Photo: Zachary Zavislak

Balsamic-Glazed Slow-Roasted Duck

Photo: Zachary Zavislak

Jerusalem Artichoke Smash

Photo: Zachary Zavislak

Banoffee Pie

Photo: Zachary Zavislak

Zucker Bakery’s Ugat Shmarim

$2; 433 E. 9th St., nr. Ave. A; 646-559-8425.

These aren’t sticky, but they are buns. Israeli-born baker-owner Zohar Zohar calls them ugot shmarim (yeast cakes), which is selling the soft and airy things short. A more accurate translation: little buttery clouds of cocoa-enhanced joy.

Photo: Zachary Zavislak

Roberta’s Sticky Bun

$2; 261 Moore St., nr. Bogart St., Bushwick; 718-417-1118, brunch only; and weekends at the BMW Guggenheim pop-up.

The copper-colored caramel on these airy brioche beauts is mostly oozing but crunchy in spots, dusted with Maldon sea salt, and totally worth risking a dental mishap over.

Photo: Zachary Zavislak

Baked

An abomination, you say? Not at Birdbath Bakery, where the patties are sautéed ten seconds for color and finished in the oven, then layered with cucumber, carrot, and watercress sauce on Orwasher's multigrain. $8.50; 160 Prince St., nr. Thompson St.; 212-612-3066.

Photo: Zachary Zavislak

Flavored

Purists might balk, but Taïm’s flavored balls do have Israeli precedents, including a controversial sweet-potato concoction. Herb green, red pepper, and harissa are constants, but the Taïm Mobile has run tomato-Thai-basil and Kalamata olive as specials. $6.25 a sandwich; 222 Waverly Pl., nr. Perry St.; 212-691-1287.

Photo: Zachary Zavislak

Shawafel

A house-baked pita pocket bursting at the seams with chicken shawarma and baked falafel, and perhaps inspired by the great New York deli tradition of loony combo sandwiches. $6.95 at Chickpea; several Manhattan locations.

Photo: Zachary Zavislak

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York
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