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Best Bets

Micromarket
Five new shops—from the vintage to the outdoor—each with a leather specialty.


Custom tool bags, from $250 at Doomed NYC, by appointment at 170 Franklin St., nr. Java St., Greenpoint; doomednyc.com.

Rolltop waterproof bags, from $125 at Filson, 40 Great Jones St., nr. Bowery; 212-457-3121.

Biker jackets, from $998 at Diesel Pop-Up Shop, 101 Bedford Ave., nr. N. 12th St., Williamsburg; August 15 through December 31; 718-387-6561.


Gold chain necklaces with vintage Kenyan pouches, from $325 at Dear: Rivington, 37 Great Jones St., nr. Lafayette St.; 212-673-3494.

Jewelry boxes, from $110 at Billykirk, 16 Orchard St., nr. Canal St.; 646-684-4050.


First Look
On August 14, the 780,000-square-foot, Art Deco–inspired Mall at Bay Plaza, the first enclosed shopping mall to hit the city in 40 years, will open at 200 Baychester Avenue in the Bronx.


Illustration by Jason Lee  

First floor
Men’s and women’s clothing: Express, Michael Kors; European fast-fashion brands F&F and Accessorize, new to the U.S.

Second floor
Juniors’ stores: American Eagle and Aeropostale make their Bronx debut; Olive Garden and Joe’s Crab Shack.

Third floor
Food court with central Coffee Beanery café; Foot Locker, House of Hoops, and Yankees Clubhouse.


2x2: Bar Carts
Follow that booze.


From left, the Weldon cart and the Parker cart.   

Colorful/Well-Priced: Weldon cart, $180 at Pier 1, 1110 Third Ave.
Neutral/Well-Priced: Parker cart, $349 at West Elm, 112 W. 18th St.



From left, the lacquered cart and custom Driscoll cart.  

Colorful/Splurgy: Lacquered cart, $1,815 at Maison 24, 470 Park Ave.
Neutral/Splurgy: Custom Driscoll cart, from $3,800 at Desiron, 200 Lexington Ave., No. 702.


Urban Export
Souklike boutiques selling drapey dresses alongside Moroccan rugs.


The Seven-Month-Old Williamsburg Version
Electric Nest: hand-dyed-silk floor pillows, sleeveless caftans (60 Broadway, nr. Wythe Ave.).



The Newly Opened Southampton Permutation
Concept: Alpaca throws, onyx bracelets (42A Jobs Ln.; conceptsouthampton.com).



Illustration by Murphy Lippincott  

Ask a Shop Clerk
On August 9, Nikki Kaufman, formerly of Quirky, launched Normal (150 W. 22nd St.), a start-up (and factory, and store) cranking out custom, 3-D-printed earphones ($199).

Did custom earbuds exist before?
Yes, but really only musicians bothered with them. You’d have to go to an otolaryngologist, who would squirt silicone into your ears while you clenched your jaw, and it could cost thousands of dollars.

How do you get the exact ear measurements?
The free Normal app prompts you to take pictures, holding up a quarter to each ear for scale. Those images go to our team, the 3-D printing takes less than two hours, and your buds are shipped. Or you can do the process in store. Come in—our doorknobs are shaped like ears—and have our team snap you with the app. Go for coffee, come back, and watch our assembly line connect the freshly printed pieces.


Trend Spawning
Woven wall hangings are above a lot of New Yorkers’ headboards these days.


March 2013
Nick Cave’s “Heard NY,” 30 dancing horses in Grand Central, uses natural- and primary-color fringe motifs referencing Southeast Asian embroidery.





May 2013
Bolstered by 26,000 Instagram likes for her Cave-inspired wall hangings, Maryanne Moodie starts teaching weaving at Brooklyn’s Makeshift Society.




June 2013
Graphic designer Sara Berks, a.k.a. MINNA, generates sales via Instagram for her Bauhaus-inspired wall hangings and befriends Moodie.




February 2014
Owyn Ruck, co-founder of the Textile Arts Center (which holds Gowanus and Greenwich Village weaving classes), helps design tapestry looks for Altuzarra’s fall line.




March 2014
Mid-century fiber artist Sheila Hicks, a pioneer in defining yarn and thread as fine-art materials, gets a nod at the Whitney Biennial.*





August 2014
A new MINNA series titled “Up Against the Wall” is set to launch as part of Nasty Gal’s first home-goods collection.


*The original version of this article incorrectly called Sheila Hicks's inclusion in the Whitney Biennial "posthumous."


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