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Best Bets: Week of March 23, 2015

First Look
On March 26, the scaffolding at Brookfield Place (250 Vesey St.) will finally come down to reveal (at least most of) downtown’s highly anticipated, $250 million shopping center.


Illustration by Jason Lee  

Street Level
1. Name Brands and Meatball Subs: Lululemon singlets; Paul Smith ombré; Theory linen; Michael Kors mohair; Vince metallics; Scoop fringe; J.Crew gingham; Davidoff cigars; Hermès totes; Ermenegildo Zegna aviators; an all-glass Bottega Veneta; Parm heroes.
2. Le District: Like Eataly, but French.
3. Saks Fifth Avenue: Lots of white marble.

Level Two
4. Smaller Lines and Celebrity Chefs: Posman Books paperbacks; Judith & Charles pencil skirts; Bonobos blazers; Vilebrequin neon swim trunks; L’Atelier de Joël Robuchon foie gras.
5. Hudson Eats: Olive’s; Dig Inn; Black Seed Bagels. (Open since last June.)
6. Equinox: 35,000-square-foot, 40-bike “Pursuit by Equinox” cycling studio; Ellary’s Greens salads.



Illustration by Murphy Lippincott  

Ask a Shop Clerk
Danish blogger and Kill Your Darlings singer Anine Bing now has an eponymous rocker-chick shop (330 Bleecker St.).

What distinguishes Anine Bing from the ubiquitous “rocker” lines?
There are deep V’s and sweatshirts in the typical rocker color scheme — gray, black, white — but I use them in Scandinavian stripe patterns; that’s my heritage. The fabrics are luxurious linens and silks, and the jeans have embroidered seams, but the same sadness that’s in my music definitely comes through. Bright colors are not me.



Illustration by Jason Lee  

How to Make (and Use) a Pinhole Camera
Three tips from Rachel Jun of Gowanus’s new and only film-developing studio, Gowanus Darkroom (160 7th St.).

1. Box: Paint the inside of a shoe box black. While it dries, cut a one-inch square of tinfoil and poke a pin-size hole. Use an X-Acto knife to then cut a penny-size hole in the center of one of the box’s longer side panels. Tape your pinhole directly over the penny hole, on the inside of the box.
2. Shutter: Fold a one-inch strip of duct tape in half to make a non-sticky flap, then tape the top edge of your flap to the outside of the box, over the pinhole. With the shutter in place, take a piece of photo paper (from any camera store) and close yourself into a closet. Tape your photo paper to the inside of the box opposite the pinhole; press on the shoe-box lid.
3. Light: Set your shoe box outdoors and point the pinhole at an inanimate object for four minutes. Back in the dark closet, untape the photo paper and seal it in an envelope for a camera store (or Gowanus Darkroom) to develop.


2x2: Armless Side Chairs
Lounge free.


Under $1,000:
Tufted:
Ingrid chair, $399 at West Elm, 112 W. 18th St.
Untufted: C. Johnson Josie chair, $550 at cjohnsonmcm.com.


Over $1,000
Tufted:
David Gaynor DGD chair, $2,225 at workof.com.
Untufted: Mango hemp rolling chair, $1,995 at ABC Home, 888 Broadway.


Know Before You Go
In mid-April, boutique boxing gym Shadowbox will debut at 28 West 20th Street ($34 per 40-person class) — complete with cold-pressed juice.


What to wear: Your spinning spandex, plus sneakers. Everlast gloves (on heavy rotation for maximum freshness) are rentable for a dollar.
What to fear: Nothing — this is a no-contact gym. You will not be punched in the face. It’s between you and your bag.
What to compare it to: Ballet. Founder Daniel Glazer has noticed that dancers pick up the synchronized footwork and simultaneous jabs incredibly quickly, as they would choreography.
What will hurt the next day: Arms, shoulders, and upper back.
What you’ll get: Muscle memory within two weeks, and with it, natural jab-cross-rolls. Also, 1,000 obliterated calories per 45-minute workout.


Top Five
Last fall, Kate Rheinstein Brodsky, formerly of Elle Decor, opened vintage-home-goods shop KRB at 135 1/2 East 79th Street, centered on her personal collection of revamped 19th-century furniture and accessories.


“We have this monumental punch bowl ($2,750) made of opaline, which is a pigmented glass that was produced in France in the late 1800s. I found it at an estate sale.”





“These Belle Rives lacquered trays (from $150) come in marine blue and bordeaux. The large one is the perfect size for a bar, and the smaller one works well as a vanity.”





“This pair of 18th-century Italian walnut armchairs ($10,500) are reupholstered in Claremont leather. They’d look lovely on either side of a fireplace.”





“I love the old Hinson print on these Turkish corner pillows ($600 each). It’s a nice heavy linen. I think a pillow is like a scarf: It’s always a good addition.”





“This set of four majolica plates ($1,000) by Wedgwood dates back to the late 1800s. They’re great for serving salad or dessert, or for wall decoration.”


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