New York Magazine

Skip to content, or skip to search.

Skip to content, or skip to search.

Pop-up-Onomics

If your shop has an expiration date, can it turn a profit? A look at one pop-up’s bottom line.

ShareThis

Store: Obesity and Speed, a small downtown brand that popped up in the back room of Earnest Sewn in the meatpacking district on July 1. It closed on August 31.
Operator: Lyz Olko, president and co-designer.

EXPENSES
Setup: $100.
“We just had to buy the paint.”

Marketing: $950 ($150 on silk-screened tote bags distributed to media; $200 for shirts worn by Earnest Sewn staffers; $600 for a ’zine and stickers.)

Opening party: $200 ($120 for liquor, $80 for mixers.)
“It was only that much because I went to Gristedes. We could have done it cheaper if we’d found a liquor sponsor.”)

Garment production: $1,500
“The clothes are pretty much made out of our apartment. The fabric is dyed in Brooklyn, then hand-printed and -sewn. Everything was limited-edition and made specially for the location.”

Transporting merchandise: $200
“We used bikes and cabs and the subway to get everything from our apartment to the store.”

Total: $2,950 ($500 from Earnest Sewn; $2,450 out of Olko and co-designer Josh Conner’s pockets.)


REVENUES: $14,000
Most popular sellers: a skull lace appliqué sweatshirt, $175; tie-back tank top, $75; Mena graphic tee, $65; braided-neck top, $85.


PROFIT: $11,050
$4,050 to Obesity and Speed, $7,000 to Earnest Sewn for use of the space and sales staff.
“Our main goal was to get more exposure, which would hopefully lead to more collaborations with other stores and brands. We’ve already set one up with Opening Ceremony for next season.”


Related:

Advertising
Current Issue
Subscribe to New York
Subscribe

Give a Gift

Advertising