Displaying all articles tagged:

In The Magazine

Most Recent Articles

Platt Disses Daniel, and Other Holiday Tales

Presidents’ Day is a holiday for Grub Street, but, thankfully, there’s enough in this week’s magazine to read till we return tomorrow. Daniel Boulud, whom Adam Platt respects as the Last Great French Chef, falls down in his new restaurant and gets only one star. In this week's "Openings," Rob and Robin introduce us to Olana (American with Italian influences) and marvel at Akhtar Nawab and Noel Cruz for putting a restaurant where Jimi Hendrix used to (reportedly) play. At Momofuku Ssäm Bar, Rob and Robin find the mind-bending “Frankensteak”: hanger steak that is literally glued to world-class rib-eye deckle. The Insatiable Critic falls for Fiore, a funky, rustic Italian place in Williamsburg; for those at risk of scurvy, pickled lemon is in "In Season" this week. But if you want a drink, you’ll find a guide to the city’s top boutique wineshops by the Gastropoda herself, Regina Schrambling.

We Haven't Had That Spirit Here Since 1968

Though it may be New York's 40th anniversary, 1968 was a rough year: the assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert Kennedy, the Tet Offensive, riots in Newark and Detroit. But one area no one could complain about was food in New York, as this week’s anniversary issue attests. Gael Greene, who was then — as now — a potent force in the city’s restaurant culture, conjures up one of the era’s most vivid restaurant scenes at Orsini's, complete with a cast ranging from Yul Brynner to Porfirio Rubirosa, the era’s greatest playboy. Rob and Robin, scoping out the city’s treats circa 1968, find everything from Japanese raw-fish sandwiches called “sushi” to quenelles at La Côte Basque. And, in a fitting tribute to an era when “fine dining” meant French food, a recipe for “ze Soufflé” at La Grenouille.

Dovetail Takes Flight, Merkato 55 Opens, and All Is Well

Well, here’s some news the food world will find welcome: Adam Platt is so won over by the Upper West Side’s Dovetail that he has gone and awarded the place three stars. And in further good news, Merkato 55, Marcus Samuelsson’s much-awaited African restaurant, finally opens its doors in the meatpacking district, as Rob and Robin report in this week’s Openings. On the other side of the trendiness spectrum, the 2nd Avenue Deli comes under the gaze of Gael Greene, and the Insatiable Critic likes what she sees. Add in a fine sangria recipe, and you have plenty to chew on in this week’s magazine.

New ‘WSJ’ Luxury-Title Editor: Which Archetype to Assign?

Tina Gaudoin
Today we learn that Tina Gaudoin will be the editor of a yet-to-exist quarterly luxury supplement to The Wall Street Journal. We imagine it will be sort of like the Times magazine T. Well, probably it will be exactly like it. But anyway, according to the memo obtained by Romenesko:
Tina will bring [the Journal] a valuable set of skills from her extensive career in the magazine world. She began her career at Tatler working as beauty editor. In 1992 she moved to New York to work on the re-launch of Harpers Bazaar. During her time in New York she also worked at Vogue as senior writer and then as a presenter on Barry Diller's Q2 channel. Returning to London, she became deputy editor of Tatler before launching the women's magazine Frank. After that she became editorial director of the iVillage UK web site . She joined The Times of London in 2003 as style director of its Saturday magazine and was named editor of the quarterly magazine The Times Luxx in June 2007.
So … luxury-journalism experience … luxury-journalism experience … something about Barry Diller … luxury-journalism experience. Hm. There doesn't seem to be anything in there about whether she is qualified to run a luxury journalism title. That is, there's no explanation of whether she has a ridiculously over-the-top personality and outrageously self-demanding personal (and sartorial) daily regimen. With a touching underdog story.

Platt Pans Brasserie 44; Make Your Own Guacamole

Bar Blanc
Reading this week’s magazine — or at least the food-related parts of it — had its own special rhythm. First came the shock and guilty excitement of reading Adam Platt’s review of Bar Blanc, which he liked, and Brasserie 44, which he didn't — zero stars. In a week with only one opening (Bridge Vineyards Tasting Room), Rob and Robin taught us how to make guacamole (there's a video, too!) and turned us on to the rebellious risotto at Dell’anima. They also found local treats that are globally inspired and clued us in on the rabbits multiplying across city menus. Gael Greene managed to get a table in the early days of Chop Suey, and her pre-pre-pre-review is favorable.

Introducing the ‘Gastroteca’

Even in the dead of winter, good new things keep happening to New York City. The Underground Gourmet giddily points out a new wine bar, Gottino, that is outpacing its panini-packing rivals. The Insatiable Critic found a new, urbane restaurant in Dovetail and loves the Sunday prix fixe. Among this week's openings, Periyali adds a midtown sister in Persephone, giving the city another blue-chip Greek restaurant. Ah, New York: Even our lean seasons have their harvests.

Alain Ducasse Tries to Win Our Love

Ducasse
New York City hasn’t been kind to Alain Ducasse. But after reading this week’s big feature on the world’s most-starred chef and his latest effort to make New York love him, we find it hard to believe that he doesn’t have a fighting chance. Adam Platt somehow manages to appreciate delicacy this week and gives Smith’s an enthusiastic two-star review. Finally, Rob and Robin bring us two things sure to warm the insides of any New Yorker in January: Charles Gabriel’s collard greens and the hot cocktails at three of New York’s best bars.

Where to Eat in 2008

Platt
New York's Adam Platt has finally surfaced from the food trough. In between gasps, he has cobbled together his annual list of where you should be eating in the New Year. Platt's got a bead on Italian small plates, which no-reservations restaurants to wait on line for, and what expensive meal is actually worth an entire paycheck. If all of that is too much to digest, Platt has bites of wisdom to guide you through 2008: his ten favorite new restaurants, the best up-and-coming chefs, and where to take your father-in-law for dinner, among others. So read up and start making reservations. We have to attend to Platt, who is up to his ears in pork and tear-stained menus. Adam Platt's Where to Eat in 2008 [NYM] Earlier: Platt: "The State of the Dining Nation Is Sound"

Plenty of Edible Reasons to Love New York

This week, in what has become an annual tradition, the magazine identifies more reasons to love New York. The city’s edibles are justification enough, and this year Rob Patronite and Robin Raisfeld present two: our enthusiasm for frying and the Dessert Truck. The Robs continue to indulge by listing some of the city’s richest dishes, like WD-50’s eggs Benedict or foie gras meat loaf from Café Gray, as well as suggesting some places for New Year’s Eve dinner. Gael Greene does not speak of Crave on 42nd with such reckless abandon, but there’s nascent hope for this week’s openings: a wine bar, a vegetarian burger joint, and an eclectic East Village bistro. Finally, Rob and Robin give us one last at-home indulgence: baked Vacherin Mont d’Or. And after twelve months of tsuris, we’ve all got it coming.

It's Time to Get Excited About the Second Avenue Deli

Second Ave. Deli
This week, Rob Patronite and Robin Raisfeld herald the impending return of the Second Avenue Deli with a peppery interview with owner Jeremy Lebewohl. Expect deep-fried chicken skins at every table, he says. Beats a bread basket. Irving Mill managed to extract a grudging single star out of the Haute Barnyard–phobic Adam Platt, and the Smith, despite a business plan dedicated to filling NYU students with “almost burnt” macaroni and cheese, was able to sway Gael Greene, no sucker for comfort food. Will the new restaurants be so lucky? The Robs introduce us to a high-concept townhouse restaurant, a grass-fed-burger joint, and a progressive Italian spot. And when you get cold from running around outside trying new restaurants, you can sip a nice hot chocolate. The Underground Gourmet found the best cups in the city.

It’s All Topsy-Turvy in This Week’s Magazine

The magazine’s content this week, which is copious, compelling, and diverse, is also curious. How in the world did Adam Platt give Primehouse New York the two stars we thought it deserves? Is it possible that the big man is softening? Likewise, we expected Gael Greene to be skeptical about Shelly’s La Tradizionale, a Shelly Fireman restaurant that was Shelly’s New York just a few short months ago — but instead she’s agog over the Italian seafood. Rob and Robin devise a guide to group dinners in the city, an antidote to the annual stress of holiday gatherings. For Hanukkah, they consulted with Julian Medina of Toloache for a Mexican take on latkes. Plus, there’s plenty of news in the openings department: Philoxenia makes a welcome return to Astoria, and Rheon Café brings high-tech Japanese restaurant equipment to New York.

A Respite From Gluttony in This Week's Magazine

So you enjoyed your immense Thanksgiving meal and then indulged in logy reveries the next few days — standing in front of the refrigerator eating stuffing with a serving spoon, building turkey BLTs to watch the game with on Saturday. By now you're thinking, Enough with the big meals already! We're here to accommodate. In this week's issue, the Underground Gourmet determines what makes a quality coffee bar (tapas and no wi-fi, for starters) and then introduces us to a new wine bar in the West Village and a new entry in Mike Jaramillo's Williamsburg empire. Also: 5 Ninth's Daniel "Chino" Parilla provides a highly digestible turnip recipe and a panel of star sommeliers make mincemeat out of the advice given by wine-store clerks. It's all easy going down, and just what you need after the exertions of the past few days.

A Sloppy Joe Sanctuary Opens Near MSG

Heading up our short list of new hotel restaurants this week was Cooper’s Tavern, a new meatery over in the New Yorker Hotel, and as such a welcome option for post–Knicks games, for those few fans who will actually have an appetite after watching the team this season. As Rob and Robin point out, Cooper’s is one of few restaurants here that attempts a serious Sloppy Joe, this one courtesy of braised short ribs. (No words on whether a can of Manwich sauce goes into the mix.). Hot-dog quartets and seafood melts round out the bar sandwich menu, but there’s other stuff too, some of it looking pretty high-end, and priced accordingly. But somehow after you watch the Knicks' offense, we bet Sloppy Joes will suffice. Cooper’s Tavern: New Yorker Hotel, 481 Eighth Ave., at 35th St.; 212-268-8460. Short List: Dining-Room Service [NYM]

Fiamma, Tailor, and Turkey Carry the Weight This Week

This week’s issue carries a lot of freight, and there isn’t much room for consideration of the gluttonous arts. So the food content is slim — but potent! Adam Platt reviews two of the most anticipated debuts in recent years, those of genius dessert chef Sam Mason’s Tailor and Beard Award–winning chef Fabio Trabocchi’s New York debut at Fiamma. But that’s not all: There’s an In Season recipe for turkey-salad sandwiches, excuse us, tramezzini di tacchino, courtesy of ’inoteca’s Eric Kleinman; a guide to four very excellent Thanksgiving alternatives courtesy of Rob and Robin; and four new hotel restaurants likewise. We figured that with all the eating and cooking that’s going on this week, that should be plenty of food writing to get you by.

What the Celebrities Are Watching on YouTube

Celebrities: so like us. They spend hours on YouTube too! To celebrate our online video special in this week's issue of New York, we asked Russell Simmons, Amy Sedaris, and The Office's Rashida Jones (along with some slightly-less-famous bloggers, artists, directors, advertising executives, professors, and comedians) what they've got bookmarked. The results may surprise you!