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Ms. Gobbler's Turn: Her Favorite Restaurants

In pale imitation of great gastronome scribblers like Calvin Trillin and the late Johnny Apple, the Gobbler has written, perhaps too often, about his wife's taste in food and restaurants (just read his last review). Possibly also like them (the Gobbler doesn't know Mr. Trillin, but he met Apple during his gruff, un-cuddly, pre-foodie days), the Gobbler is often accused by his wife of egregiously distorting her views (you bet he does). Ms. Gobbler would like the world to know that her most-used word is not "yummy," that if given the choice, she'd prefer to eat at home, and that her favorite drink really is champagne. "Also, you always make me sound elfin," she told the Gobbler just a moment ago, "and I am not elfin." In a hasty (and desperate) attempt to clarify the record, I've asked Ms Gobbler to list her current favorite restaurants in town. It goes without saying that Mr. Gobbler approves of these fine establishments, too.

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Flatbush Farm Takes Haute Barnyard to the Next Level

Flatbush Farm 76-78 St. Marks Ave., nr. Sixth Ave., Park Slope, Brooklyn; 718-622-3276 With the possible exception of the Bay Area, Brooklyn may be the world epicenter of so-called local, seasonal, and — in the prevailing menu-speak — "organic whenever possible" cooking. In the past, it's been enough to cite farm sources (360, Franny's) or host farmer dinners (Applewood). Now, Kings County Haute Barnyard restaurants are confusing matters by naming themselves as if they were, in fact, produce-purveying competition for the Park Slope Coop. First came the Farm on Adderley, in Ditmas Park, and now there's Flatbush Farm, a bar and restaurant in the old Bistro St. Mark's space that started serving small plates over the summer and launched its dining-room menu late last month. Chef Eric Lind, late of Bayard's, has the right rural connections: His former boss, chef Eberhard Müller, co-owns Satur Farms on the North Fork and supplies Lind with locally grown produce. Aside from a few artfully displayed farm implements and staid portraits, the long, high-ceilinged space is more urban chic than country quaint; paper napkins and juice glasses for wine are the most notable signs of the restaurant's commitment to the Simple Life. But Lind's menu lives up to its rustic promise with hearty dishes like spaetzle with mushroom ragout and lamb shoulder with bubble and squeak. One night's pork goulash was a tough, chewy disappointment, but the special salmon-cake appetizer was a textural triumph, moist and meaty over a bed of leeks and grainy mustard. One of those and a Pinkus Organic Ur Pils in the Indian-summer-worthy garden is about as bucolic as Brooklyn gets. — Rob Patronite and Robin Raisfeld Read Adam Platt's Haute Barnyard top ten.

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The Haute Barnyard Hall of Fame

New York magazine restaurant critic Adam Platt files periodic musings for Grub Street, under the pseudonym the Gobbler. Haute Barnyard restaurants like the Tasting Room have been around for a while now, but the phrase is new — so new, in fact, that the Gobbler is the only one using it. Therefore it requires a little elaboration. All Haute Barnyard restaurants are Greenmarket establishments, of course, their menus more or less dictated by the rhythms of the season. New York's versions of the genre, however, have evolved their own highly self-conscious style.

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