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Erin Fetherston

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Fiamma, Tailor, and Turkey Carry the Weight This Week

This week’s issue carries a lot of freight, and there isn’t much room for consideration of the gluttonous arts. So the food content is slim — but potent! Adam Platt reviews two of the most anticipated debuts in recent years, those of genius dessert chef Sam Mason’s Tailor and Beard Award–winning chef Fabio Trabocchi’s New York debut at Fiamma. But that’s not all: There’s an In Season recipe for turkey-salad sandwiches, excuse us, tramezzini di tacchino, courtesy of ’inoteca’s Eric Kleinman; a guide to four very excellent Thanksgiving alternatives courtesy of Rob and Robin; and four new hotel restaurants likewise. We figured that with all the eating and cooking that’s going on this week, that should be plenty of food writing to get you by.

Al Gore: Cashing In on His Big Year

FINANCE • Al Gore, venture capitalist? The Nobel laureate and Apple board member is taking a hands-on role at Kleiner Perkins, the leading Silicon Valley venture firm. His goal: Save the world. And annoy GE's Jeff Immelt as much as possible. [Fortune] • Harvard picked Robert S. Kaplan, a former Goldman Sachs vice-chairman, as the new steward for the $35 billion endowment. Something tells us his kids won't have any trouble getting in. [Reuters via NYT] • A few management consultants with nothing better to do gave the Times its newest buzzword: CEO version 3.0. With the departures of Stan O'Neal, Chuck Prince, and Richard Parsons, it's now time for leaders "who can assemble a team that functions as smoothly as a jazz sextet." Because, as James Cayne showed, the old CEOs were way too bebop. [NYT]

Jeffrey Chodorow Still in the Steak Game With Latest Restaurant

The Observer has the dope on Jeffrey Chodorow’s latest restaurant in the Empire Hotel: It’s to be a “classic American steakhouse.” Not a surprising choice, given how hassle-free, popular, and profitable steakhouses are — when they’re not Kobe Club, anyway. Jay-C is in Italy for a week, but as soon as we can get ahold of him, we’ll have the details. Given the ambition of his latest ventures, we’d be surprised if this is just another meatery. Chodorow to Open 'Classic Steakhouse' in Empire Hotel [NYO]

Irving Mill's 500-Year-Old Bar Table? Might Want to Use a Coaster

For your next birthday party, why not dine at a table that’s 300 to 500 years old? You can find just that at Irving Mill, thanks to the determination of owner-designer Sergio Riva. At a trade show he met the owner of Blue Ocean Traders and — sight unseen — purchased one of the 3,000-pound, six-feet-in-diameter millstones (used to grind flour, wheat, and the like) that the company sometimes receives from Egypt. How much does such a behemoth cost? Just $700 plus $2,000 for shipping, it turns out. “They must be giving these things away in Egypt,” Riva laughs. Actually, Riva’s particular stone came from western China. When he got it after weeks of nagging his supplier, he asked a friend to build (for $2,000) a 42-inch-high base made from steel plates so that patrons can use the artifact as a bar table. And boy if that doesn’t make us appreciate the wheat in our Spaten much more.

Kirna Zabête Likes Thakoon, Proenza, and Fetherston

Retailer
Throughout the week, the buyers from Kirna Zabête, Henri Bendel, Intermix, and more will tell us which runway looks they plan on stocking. Today, Sarah Easley, co-owner of Kirna Zabête, shares her picks from the recent collections. She loves Thakoon's paillette dresses, all of Proenza, and Erin Fetherston's palette.

Sheer Delights

sheerest sheer
Why dress for warmth when you can expose yourself? Designers are doling out sheer necklines for fall’s cocktail attire. Proenza Schouler’s iridescent midnight-blue dress comes with see-through ornate collar and bodice. Erin Fetherston’s black minidress covers up (sort of) with a sheer black, three-quartered sleeve overlay. And BCBG’s geometrically cut-out collar and sleeves offer slivers of skin, which will accessorize nicely with goose bumps.

Loosen Up!

loose dresses
The belted silhouette is finally getting a rest: Loose, short, shift dresses have been spotted in most of this season’s major collections. 3.1 Phillip Lim put Chanel Iman in a peach-toned dress with a ruffled collar. Erin Fetherston’s simple, straight gray version was accented with patterned, sheer scarves trailing alongside. Diane von Furstenberg added a bold splash of red to an otherwise relaxed, basic little black dress. So go ahead, eat dessert.

Sari Sloane of Intermix Likes DVF, Matthew Williamson, Yigal Azrouël

intermix
Throughout the week, buyers from Bergdorf Goodman, Bird, Intermix, and Jeffrey New York will tell us which runway looks they plan to snatch up for fall. These are the first picks from Sari Sloane, VP of fashion merchandising at Intermix. She's enjoying fall's dark colors, and her favorites include Yigal Azrouel, Erin Fetherston, Diane von Furstenberg, and more.

Au Naturel on the Runways

No makeup
Fall's faces are blank. Don't expect dark eyes or deep lips — the biggest shows so far went for natural looks. Lacoste and Yeohlee showed bare eyes, while Erin Fetherston's girls sported softly flushed cheeks. A few shows offered slight splashes of color like the rose-hued lips at Abaete and Twinkle's lightly violet eyes. Combine this with the perfect pallor, and you'll be right at home with your favorite MisShape.

Waistbands Shoot for the Sky

High-waisted jeans
After years of creeping steadily south, the waistband has shot up so high that even your mother's jeans will be chic this fall. High-waisted pants and denim hit the runways in droves at Bruce, Grey Ant, Erin Fetherston, and Karen Walker. Grey Ant's wide-legged pair dipped seductively in the back, with just the suggestion of butt cleavage. Fetherston cinched at the waist, with pleating that won't be flattering for all. Bruce's deep blue-denim hugged the hips and tummy, making them even less figure-friendly than your skinniest jeans.

America's Mayor and South Africa's Police Chief?

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You can't take Rudy Giuliani anywhere these days. He merely visited Johannesburg in June to speak at a conference, and he commented that crime there could be reduced by 60 percent if the city were run like a business. Since then, the South African city has been abuzz with rumors that the mayor who transformed urban policing in the United States is set to oversee security when Johannesburg hosts the 2010 World Cup — or maybe even to take over policing the city. (According to one local commentator, Bill Bratton, the former NYPD commissioner now running L.A.'s force, turned down the job — and a seven-figure salary — in the late nineties.) But it's all just wishful thinking, says Giuliani spokesman Sunny Mindel. "Mr. Giuliani spoke in general terms about how to turn around an urban center," she says, noting that Joburg mayor Amos Masondo has never formally offered Giuliani any job. And the soccer people say his intervention isn't necessary, anyway. "We are certain that South Africa's authorities have the necessary resources to face the task of providing security and safety for World Cup 2010," says their top flack. Mayor Masondo, remaining coy, declined to comment. — Nadine Rubin

‘Izakaya’ Boom Hits Chelsea; Japanese Chains Plant Flags Uptown

If you still don't know what an izakaya is (or haven't lately been to St. Marks Place, where most of them are clustered), enlighten yourself at Izakaya Ten, the latest iteration of the space that was the French-Korean D'or Ahn, and then, for a nanosecond, the sushi restaurant Anzu. Owner Lannie Ahn has hired a veteran of Morimoto and Nobu to supplement the raw fish with a selection of small plates of the home-style Japanese fare one finds in a sake bar or pub — not your basic mozzarella sticks or buffalo wings but more exotic tidbits like natto omelettes, ginger pork belly, pan-seared rice balls, and the ever-popular chicken-meatball skewer.