Displaying all articles tagged:

Julian Schnabel

Most Recent Articles

Julian Schnabel Attacked by Feral Blogger

Schnabulous
So Julian Schnabel had a little outburst on Monday at the Oscar-nominees' luncheon, wherein he said to the Los Angeles Times, “It’s interesting to be nominated for Best Direction, Best Editing, Best Cinematography, Best Screenplay, but not Best Picture. I don’t know what else you have to do to make a picture." Obviously, we, as dedicated Schnabelites, find this quip charming and endearing and, frankly, quite right, but Vanity Fair Oscar blogger S.T. VanAirsdale was not amused. He called the Schnab's remarks "ungracious" and the man himself "thin-skinned," and then gloated about how Schnabel actually did get sort of shafted by the Academy and how "it's okay to pity him" even though he's so, like, difficult. Now, we don't know who or what this S.T. VanAirsdale is — we imagine this little rant being written by a prize-winning terrier — but this will not stand. Clearly, VanAirsdale has not been so fortunate as to receive a Schnug from the Diving Bell and the Butterfly director, but has he ever seen the man? Schnabel is not thin, -skinned or otherwise. He is sensitive and Schnabulous, and he does not need anyone's pity, okay? God. Little Gold Men [VF via Carpetbagger/NYT]

‘Vanity Fair’ Goes to the Schneighborhood

Palazzo Chupi
As you may know, we at Intel have something of an obsession with the big, pink artist-auteur Julian Schnabel and his big, pink West Village home, the Palazzo Chupi. The Chupi is not just a real-estate development: It is a monument to Baby-Boomer Bohemian Bourgeois lifestyle, containing as it does not only the family Schnabel, but the actor Richard Gere (Maharishi, RIP) and some guy from Credit Suisse, as well as 180 casement-ed windows, earthenware-and-marble bathtubs, cast-concrete countertops, and several hundred emerald-green terra-cotta tiles. It's also kind of a poignant monument to Schnabel's career. In the March issue of Vanity Fair, Ingrid Sischy details the making of what she calls his Gesamtkunstwerk ("total artwork"), from when Schnabel first moved into the $2.1 million building ("He covered the walls with red velvet, brought in a few possessions, including Picasso's Femme au Chapeau, and ran The Godfather on his VCR 24 hours a day") to the present ("Bono, Johnny Depp, Martha Stewart, Hugh Jackman, and Madonna have all checked out the remaining residences for sale, at prices ranging for $27 million to $32 million"). There's symbolism here that we don't want to quite contemplate. But look at the pictures after the jump! They're Schnabulous.

Julian Schnabel Gives Us a Schnug

Julian Schnabel
Since his Diving Bell and the Butterfly was released to wide critical acclaim and he received a Best Director Oscar nomination nod, Julian Schnabel has been basking in adulation like a seal in the afternoon sun. Much of the attention has come from us at Intel, who find everything about Schnabel, from his irascible braggadocio to his pajamas to his frontal and dorsal man-fur, extremely compelling. But other people love El Schnabuloso, too, like Lou Reed, who mentioned his longtime friend and neighbor's "big old heart," when he introduced him as an honoree at the amFar awards last night. But how big was that heart, and was there room in there for us? We sidled up to the Schnabel to try and find out.

Julian Schnabel Finds It in His Heart to Forgive Sean Young

Schnabulous
Big snuggly papa bear Julian Schnabel isn't mad at Sean Young for drunkenly heckling him during his speech at the Directors Guild Awards the other night. He just wants to press the Blade Runner star, who has subsequently checked into rehab, to his frontal afghan and make it all better. "It was fine. It was really fine. I'm sorry she got taken out of there," the Schab, who has surely witnessed worse behavior from substance abusers in his day, told USA Today. "If I had a couple of minutes with her, I could have brought her up on stage and we could have worked it out." Now that would have been an award-winning show. Schnabel: No hard feelings [USAT] Earlier: Sean Young Learns Not to Mess With the Schnabel

Sean Young Learns Not to Mess With the Schnabel

Schnabel
By now you have probably heard that Sean Young, she of Blade Runner and Baby: Secret of the Lost Legend, had wee bit of an alcoholic moment at the Directors Guild Awards on Saturday. In case you missed it, Young slurred, "Get on with it," during our friend Julian Schnabel's acceptance speech, after which she was forcibly removed from the premises and sent straight to rehab, because that's what happens when you fuck with His Schnabulousness. Because the DGA Awards were tragically untelevised, the story has until now been passed along like folklore: via the written word and Julie Chen's excellent dramatic reenactment of the incident on Letterman. But today the Hollywood Reporter, bless them, posted a video, which we present to you above. Young's not in it, but let's face it, it's not really her that matters. Video Exclusive: Sean Young Versus Julian Schnabel [Hollywood Reporter] Earlier: Intel's Coverage of Julian Schnabel

Jerry Stiller Forgot His Manties!

Jerry Stiller
Jerry Stiller said he had a senior moment when he exited the locker room at the Jewish Community Center on Amsterdam sans bathing suit. Peter Brant, who bought out his ex-wife's half of Interview magazine last week, is pleased to have traded Ingrid Sischy for Glenn O'Brien. On Friday, Lindsay Lohan drank vodka at the Box and at the Beatrice Inn while partying with Stavros Niarchos and Brody Jenner before returning to the Four Seasons Hotel to spend the night with Niarchos. Eli Manning and fiancée Abby McGraw ate dinner at Il Mulino in the Village (he got a standing ovation when he left). At the Plumm, Tracy Morgan ordered two bottles of Champagne, ripped off his shirt and started dancing on the banquette, seemingly lost his credit card, found it in his pocket, and then asked a waitress if he could father her baby. Sacha Baron Cohen and Isla Fisher ate at Café Gray.

Because He's Schnabulous

Heath
The list of reasons why we love Julian Schnabel are many and varied — he is large and hairy, but has a funny Mickey Mouse voice; he constructed a large pink castle in the middle of the city and named it Palazzo Chupi; he can often be found in pajamas and sometimes a skirt; he has more progeny than we can keep track of; he appears to have no filter whatsoever. Perhaps most importantly, he is one of a diminishing number of personalities from an era when New York City, even on its worst days, felt like more than just a collection of Duane Reades and bank branches clustered on a chunk of concrete. And now we add to our list an exchange from the Daily Telegraph's profile of the Schnab, which we have transcribed below.
Schnabel: I kid around a lot. I have a lot of fun. But most people don't have a sense of humor.… And then I read in this other thing that I was name-dropping all the time. Well it just so happens that the people I know are famous. You know, they work in the movies with me. They're my friends. It's like if I said… What's your name?
Reporter: (Thinks: My name? We have been talking for the past two hours.) Mick.
Schnabel: Mick what?
Reporter: Mick Brown.
Schnabel: Okay, so I could say I was talking to Mick Brown the other day — I might well say that. (His tone sounds doubtful.) But they might not know who Mick Brown is.
Reporter: (Thinks: Maybe they will after I become famous for murdering a famous artist/director.)
Julian Schnabel, Larging It [Daily Telegraph]

Julian Schnabel May Get a Schnoscar!

Schnoscar
This morning, Intel obsession Julian Schnabel was nominated for Best Director for The Diving Bell and the Butterfly. The film, which New York's David Edelstein called a "masterpiece," was also nominated for achievements in editing and cinematography, but we know that Schnabel will not be entirely placated by this honor — if you're near the in the West Village right now, you can probably hear him stalking around the Palazzo Chupi in his purple pajamas, spittle and crumbs flying into his beard as he rages about how he was supposed to get a Best Picture nod but it's all political and polemical and the Academy is just pissed off because he's having so much fun — but we're proud of him, anyway. Oscar Nominations Announced [CNN] Related: Can Julian Get a Schnomination? [Vulture]

Alexandra Kerry Weighs In on Hillary's Tears

Alexandra Kerry
At last night's opening of Julian Schnabel's show at the Sperone Westwater Gallery, we ran into Alexandra Kerry (daughter of former presidential candidate John). She was there with BlackBook founder Evan Schindler, who is now running Tar Art Media, a socially conscious arts-media collective. Kerry is working with Schindler on some projects, including a narrative film of Norman Mailer's The Naked and the Dead, screenwritten by the author's son ("We're doing a reading of it, actually, in February, with Alec Baldwin and Harvey Keitel and Josh Lucas!"). Since Kerry is a woman and political by heritage, we asked her, naturally, about Hillary's tears. "There has never been a politician who hasn't stood onstage and been moved at one time or another and affected by something emotionally," she told us. "I think it is very human and very normal." How reasonable! But surely it was all a ruse to trick us into voting for her? "The kind of pressure that each candidate is under is not something that I think the average person can understand, so I give her the liberty and the freedom to have her moment," Kerry said. "And I don't think that's something someone would act. I would like to give the benefit of the doubt to anyone who is standing up there and running, particularly in the Democratic party. So I honestly have to say that I don't think it's my place to judge what her motivations are. I mean, it may be completely honest." A-ha! It "may be completely honest." Girl, you've got a future in politics. —Andrew Goldstein

Three Interviews With Julian Schnabel

Mugrabi
Intel crush Julian Schnabel has been making the promotional rounds for the Diving Bell and the Butterfly, and after reading through a few of his interviews, we can report that whether he's "picking at a crab cake" in Philadelphia, "stretched on the floor in his blue silk pajamas," or "propped up by cushions like some flannel-shirted artist's model" in a Toronto hotel, he's just as Schnabulous as ever. A few of our favorite bits: • On his preferred interviewing style: "Lie down, like I said. Please, just try it, just try it. OK. I will do the same. Put your head down. Now you can just relax and ask me anything you want, and we will be on the same plane." • On artists David Salle and Robert Longo, who made films that didn't do as well as Diving Bell and the Butterfly: "Well, they're not very good painters (either)."

Rule No. 1: Never Acknowledge What the Schnabel Is Wearing

Schnabel
Some cowboy from the Houston Chronicle interviewed His Schnabulousness last week. Perhaps his mind was addled after an hour of watching Schnabel's leg hairs trailing through the azure depths of the hotel pool by which the interview was conducted, or perhaps as a straight-arrow Texan from a town where men don't wear skirts, no sirree, he just couldn't help himself, but something caused him to open his mouth and ask a question that no man has ever dared to ask. "I had to ask, politeness be damned," he wrote. "What are you wearing?"
He looked surprised by the question. "What? This?" he asked, as if he really thought I might've been asking about his sandals. "This is a shirt I picked up last night at Target," he said, looking bemused, "and this is a pareo, from Indonesia." "Ahh. A pareo. From Indonesia." What now? Was I obliged to compliment him on it? What would Miss Manners advise? It seemed a good time to say goodbye.
Yes, Eric Harrison of the Houston Chronicle. Yes it does. Earlier: All Things Schnabel Julian Schnabel on the Diving Bell and the Butterfly [Houston Chronicle]

Julian Schnabel's Hands Would Like ‘GQ’ to Run a Correction

Mack
Julian Schnabel has a bone to pick with Andrew Corsello's Schnabulous profile of him in GQ this month, one Boston Globe reporter found when he went to interview the director of The Diving Bell and the Butterfly. Perhaps, you might say, Schnabel took issue with being called a "fat, famous, hairy, rich, name-dropping blowhard"? Not so much. What troubled him was something else.
"Look at these hands," he urges, laying them flat on the table. In the profile, Andrew Corsello describes Schnabel's hands as "thick, unpretty, blue-collar" and his fingers as "scratched, filthy with dirt and paint, medium-sized." "Do these look blue collar?"
Even after the Globe reporter assures him that Corsello was way off and honestly in the dark someone might mistake his fingers for those of Muffie Potter Aston, Schnabel is still clearly obsessing.
He puts out his hand for a shake, and then holds on. It's actually not much of a handshake. In his grasp, Schnabel keeps the embrace for a good 10 seconds, making sure he's able to show the softness of the skin. "These are delicate hands," he says.
Big Man on Canvas (screen, too) [Boston Globe] Earlier:Julian Schnabel is Numero Uno!