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Matthew Williamson

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There Goes the Schneighborhood

Richard Gere has put his apartment in Julian Schnabel's Palazzo Chupi on the market, private-equity execs come down to earth, Sam Zell continues to be wacky, and Jeff Zucker and Harvey Weinstein fight like a couple of queens over 'Project Runway' in our daily roundup of real-estate, finance, media and law news.

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The Critic Is Dead, Says Critic

While Patrick Goldstein makes a number of excellent points about the changing role of criticism in American culture, his essay suffers from its anticlimactic conclusion.

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Heath Ledger’s Family Fights for the Right to His Money

It's been two months since Heath Ledger died of an accidental overdose in his Soho apartment, and despite the salacious details of his death, everyone involved has remained somewhat tasteful about it. Memorial services in Australia and Los Angeles were tasteful, low-key affairs, and family members and friends (and Mary-Kate Olsen) have all kept their mouths shut about it for the most part. Until now. Ledger's family (not including Michelle Williams, the mother of his daughter Matilda) has exploded into squabbling over the management of his estate.

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Blechtacular! Chinatown Fish-Parts Collector Unveils His Masterwork

This is a little outside our field of coverage and well outside the bounds of good taste, but we’ve mentioned rogue taxidermist Nate Hill’s Chinatown garbage tours before. Last Friday, after a year of work, he unveiled his magnum opus, A.D.A.M. (A Dead Animal Man) — a reproduction of a human being he made by stitching together restaurant refuse and other animal parts. The piece is for sale but no longer on public display (Hill is moving into a studio apartment with it — “It’s going to be in a room with me while I sleep”), so we thought we’d give you a first look. Trust us, this thing is more disturbing than the Cloverfield monster and the Teeth monster sewn together.

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What Happens at the Waverly Inn Stays on the Waverly Inn's New Blog!

When chef John DeLucie sold his memoir, we wondered whether the secrets of the Waverly Inn weren’t all being saved for a book. It turns out they were being saved for a blog — oh yes, Vanity Fair’s site has launched a chronicle of the goings-on at the Waverly, and though there’s a cloying Metropolitan Diary tone to anecdotes about the restaurant’s “manager and moat-minder” Emil Varda returning $100 bribes and “cougar lean maitre d’” Larry Poston fretting over a no-show pregnant diva, the voyeur in us appreciates the story about an impromptu knife juggler getting depantsed in the dining room. (It's better than the musings of, say, the Union Square Hospitality Group newsletter — Danny Meyer likes Meyer lemons!) But a note to the anonymous author: Bragging about having “a cosmetics tycoon, a Nascar champion, and a renowned humorist” on the books ain’t going to cut it. Name some names! Ye Waverly Blog [VF] Related: Waverly Inn Chef John DeLucie to Publish Tell-All

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Heilemann: Clintons Had South Carolina Coming

“A good, old-fashioned butt-kicking” was the phrase that Barack Obama’s chief strategist, David Axelrod, used to describe what went down on Saturday in South Carolina’s Democratic primary. And that’s exactly what it was. I’m not talking here just about the overall margin — 55-27 — by which Obama whomped Hillary Clinton. I mean the composition of his victory (the details of which you can find here.) Among the most noteworthy stats to be found in the South Carolina exit polls is that the collapse of Obama’s support among white voters suggested by some pre-primary polls did not occur. As Axelrod noted, the unofficial over-under number on the eve of the vote was 10 percent of this category — but Obama actually ended up with 24 percent. More stunning, he essentially tied Clinton among Caucasian men and captured more than half of the white voters under 30. Finally, the hopemonger reached beyond his customary well-off/well-schooled constituency and carried at least a plurality of voters at every economic and education level – and this is crucial to his prospects on Tsunami Tuesday, February 5.

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