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Nick Denton

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Gawker Media Fires Nineteen Employees

Owner Nick Denton, in an e-mail to staff, predicts that people will call this the end of ‘the golden age of the blog.’

By Chris Rovzar

‘Bastards. Bastards All.’

Michelle Malkin confirms that Sarah Palin's e-mail account was indeed hacked this morning, and has some wise words for those who would mess with the Alaska governor.

By Chris Rovzar

Nation, Gird Your Loins! The Lopez-Anthony Twins Cometh!

Lo
Jennifer Lopez has checked into her private room at Long Island's North Shore University Hospital, presumably so that she can give birth to the babies that have been making her look majorly fat lately. This very important news comes to us courtesy of "Page Six," and since the Post went to press last night, this could mean that babies are bursting out of J.Lo's vagina right this very second. Not that we would know if they were, because the hospital is on lockdown. According to the esteemed New Zealand Herald, Lopez has "banned staff from entering the room where she is due to give birth." This is likely due to the fact that People magazine has reportedly offered $6.5 million for pictures of the twins, the most money a baby has fetched since the magazine paid $4 million for pics of Shiloh Jolie-Pitt in 2004. However, since there are two Lopez babies, it's really only $3.25 million per twin, and that's is kind of a slap in the face if you think about it. In any case,* the black-market number for purloined photos is said to be significantly higher. We hear Star is offering an undisclosed but gargantuan sum to anyone who can bring them a photo of the twins with the umbilical cord still attached, and Nick Denton, of Gawker, will pay $7 per second of streaming video to anyone who has the gumption to film the actual birth scene, complete with a sweaty, screaming J.Lo and a pallid and revolted Marc Anthony. Placenta, of course, will be auctioned on eBay starting at midnight the day of the birth. J.Lo Checks In [NYP] *From here to the end everything we say is lies

How to Be a Gawker

Denton
"We need to put back the Gawkeresque angry-creative-underclass glint to our voice," Valleywag contributor Paul Boutin wrote in a self-serious and totally fascinating memo passed on to Gawker Media editors this morning by managing editor Noah Robischon and passed on to Intel…later. The memo to the various writers in Nick Denton's snarky blog empire suggests that they take care to make sure each item contains a "glint of nastiness." But don't overdo it! Cramming in a ton of insults makes the site look a lot "less brilliant," Boutin says. When eviscerating a target, it's best to "pick the one best dig, and save the others for another time."

Being Filthy Rich Means Never Having to Say You're Sorry

FINANCEFortune searches Davos for financiers to express contrition over the current credit crisis but comes up empty. The closest anyone has come, the magazine notes, is the chairman and chief executive of Moody's Corp, who said, "We and others have to retool our processes … In hindsight, it's clear to us that there were fundamental failures in key assumptions supporting our analytical models." Quoth Fortune: "That's probably a little too mealy-mouthed and much too late to console people who bought the mortgage-backed commercial paper to which Moody's and its rival Standard & Poor's gave a top-notch AAA rating — only to discover it was actually junk." Snap! [Fortune] • Just how big a fraud did Jérôme Kerviel, the rogue French trader, pull off? Before the bank caught him, he had taken out positions worth 50 billion euros. But some argue that he was responsible for only 1.5 billion euros in losses, and the bank's board lost the other 3.4 billion euros unwinding his positions way too fast. Meanwhile, top executive Jean-Pierre Mustier told the Times: “I was speaking to a competitor, this competitor called me and said, ‘You are living what is a banker’s worst nightmare.’” Imagine how dramatic that must have sounded in French. [FT, NYT] • Bonuses now in the bank, Goldman rewarded bankers for a record-setting year with a special surprise: layoffs! [Deal Journal/WSJ]