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Today in Unroch and Cordera: The Plot Thickens, and Will the Pants Come Off?

Maximilia Cordero and William Unroch will not be stopped! As we mentioned yesterday, the model/Jeffery Epstein rape-accuser and her lawyer-boyfriend filed a defamation suit against the Post for a series of stories they say "paint an outrageous, false, and defamatory portrait of the victim plaintiff and her attorney as 'money-seeking lawyers and their women." Strangely absent from the complaint was a specific rebuttal to the Post's allegation that Maximilia was actually born a man, which the twosome had previously denied. Therefore, we assumed that Maximilia was indeed a man and was getting to be okay with that. However! Speaking about her lawsuit to the Daily News' "Rush and Molloy" this morning, the lady again denied she was a dude: "They put in vicious lies — that I'm a man, that I'm on hormone therapy, that I've had cosmetic surgery," she said. Now, Above the Law has a birth certificate up on their site for a Maximilia Josephine Cordero, born in 1983. It looks kind of fake, but note the two masculine-ish names! Man? Not a man? What? "If the judge orders her to pull her pants down, [the gender question] will be answered very quickly," Unroch told the News. The way this has all been snowballing, we queasily expect photos of Cordero's mystery genitals to appear on Radar within the week. Rush and Molloy [NYDN] Maximilia Cordero: Maybe Not a Man? [Above the Law]

Bloomberg's Baby Problems: They Just Keep Popping Out

FINANCE • Another woman joined the federal discrimination lawsuit against Bloomberg LP. After her first child in 2005, her pay fell and her colleagues turned into sharks. One supervisor even asked, "What is this, your third baby?" [NYT] • More of the same on the Street: Bank of America wrote down $3 billion, Bear Stearns $1.2 billion, and British bank HSBC took the cake with $3.4 billion, largely due to U.S. mortgage weaknesses. Meanwhile, Goldman CEO Lloyd Blankfein laughed in everyone's face, predicting no more write-downs (not that they lost much in the first place) at the Teflon bank. [NYP, NYT, NYT, DealBreaker] • Is the credit crunch just like Enron all over again? So says Bethany McLean, the reporter who first broke Ken Lay's fraud wide open. [Fortune]

New ‘Radar’: This Time, Prince Harry in Boxers

Yippee: The September Radar is almost here! Which means it's time for early teases of the cover story! The mag posted the new cover yesterday, and Drudge picked it up today, and we're sure you're shocked to discover it features a Photoshopped image of a celebrity's head on an underwear-clad body. (Interestingly, the underwear isn't white.) Also, "Pop, Politics, Scandal, Style" has given way to "Fresh Intelligence" as the slogan, and there's nary a mention of Paris Hilton, a presidential candidate, or any sort of homosexuality (in either babies or pets). We barely recognize the thing. The Trouble with Harry [Radar via Drudge] Earlier: The March of 'Radar'

‘Radar’ Throws a Party, and We Discover We Are Not Cool Enough to Buy Drinks

And what [owner Simon Hammerstein] absolutely doesn’t want is for the Box to be known as a club. “It’s a dinner theater!” Simon interjects sternly whenever you mention the C-word. “It could be the hottest club in New York,” adds Lucas, one of 30-odd investors. “But if that’s all it is, then it is a failure. If he turns it into a club, then I’m going to kick his ass.”
— "What's in the Box," New York,
February 5, 2007
Last night Radar magazine fêted its seventh issue at Hammerstein's non-club. The invitation said the party would run from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. It was a pleasant affair. A few minutes after ten, we tried to order another drink. We expected the free bar to be closed; we pulled out our AmEx to open a tab. The barman would not accept it. No, no, we said, we know the open bar is closed, and we'll pay. We were not permitted to. We were not cool enough. Our money was not good enough. We were to leave. We did. Sounds an awful lot like a club to us, no? Oh, also: We will never set foot in that place again.

‘Radar’ Finds a
Permanent(ish) Home

Back in October, the Observer reported that third-time's-the-charm Radar magazine was thisclose to moving into a permanent office. And it wasn't just any office; the space near Columbus Circle was home to Esquire until the new Hearst Tower opened. “I think it’s all but signed,” Radar editor Maer Roshan said at the time, noting that old Esquire posters still dotted the walls and that the space came with "the apparatus of making magazines." But he also told Off the Record reporter Michael Calderone that he wasn't taking the space in an attempt to ape the venerable men's mag's success: "I’m a great fan of Esquire, but it didn’t really play a role in our decision." And a good thing, too, judging from the mass e-mail just arrived from Radar senior writer Jeff Bercovici.

A ‘Time’ to Laugh, a ‘Time’ to Weep

So the new Time magazine is out. We must say that we find it much like the old Time magazine, except that it is, well, a little prettier. (The Time logo on the cover is smaller, the cover teasers are now in boxes — like, perhaps, a banner across a Web page? — and the inside pages have a lighter, airier feel, with big, bold headlines.) It looks lovely — which we're sure we'd say if it hadn't been designed by our admired pal Luke Hayman, who was New York's creative director until he was lured away to work on Time's makeover. Surprisingly, though, a controversy has arisen over this first new Time cover.

‘Radar’ Calling

A Radar editor left a cell phone on — as in, making a call to someone's voice mail — during a meeting, and the recording showed that staff meetings are disorganized. Donald Trump is planning to build a $125 million house in Palm Beach, and the locals aren't happy about it. Damaging tape of Britney Spears "partying" with two dancers at a club may soon surface. A play about Spalding Gray shows he wasn't a very attentive father. Brandon Davis tells his parents he's an art dealer; he may actually be a different type of dealer. A married TV anchorwoman is about to get dumped for having an affair.

Barbarians at the Energy Grid

FINANCE • A group led by Kohlberg Kravis is taking energy giant TXU private for $45 billion, besting the Blackstone record by $6 billion. But can Kravis beat Schwarzman's party? [NYT] • Gary Crittenden named Citigroup CFO. Job description: Fix CEO Charles Prince's mistakes. [NYT] • Goldman media banker Sebastian Grigg may defect to Credit Suisse. [DealBook/NYT]

The March of ‘Radar’

The new Radar arrived in yesterday's mail. We've seen it before, when Roshan & Co. leaked its cover to the Huffington Post's uniquely uncynical media blog, Eat the Press. But actually holding the thing in our hands suddenly brought back memories of so many Radars perdu. And so we took a walk down memory lane, examining all six Radar covers (you can click on them for larger versions) and noticing what's changed and what's stayed the same in the nearly four years — four years! — since the mag's first premiere issue.

Susan Orlean Thinks You're Fat

Long before politicians realized their idiotic public gaffes would be indexed forever in YouTube, writers faced a similar but somehow graver problem: ill-advised books published early in their career that stick around on shelves forever to haunt their authors. On Radar Online today, Claire Zulkey catalogues many of those wish-they-were-forgotten titles, hitting many of the greatest hits, like Lynne Cheney's sapphic romp and Scooter Libby's oddly bestial mystery. We were most interested, however, in a less well-known work that made the cut. New Yorker scribes Patricia Marx and Susan Sistrom — that's Susan Orlean to you — apparently once interrupted their careers to author the compelling The Skinny: What Every Skinny Woman Knows About Dieting and Won't Tell You!, which, according to Amazon commenters, is a "sick book by unhealthy women" filled with "tips on self-destruction." We'd love to ascribe this detour to youthful desperation, but the book was published in 1999 — one year after The Orchid Thief and while Marx was firmly ensconced in a career as a novelist and Saturday Night Live writer. The book's money quote? "Eat all you want, but never swallow. Spit always." And to think of all the money Si Newhouse has wasted on their expense accounts. Read in the Face [Radar Online]

Donald Trump: Short-Memoried Vulgarian, Too

From "Page Six" today, on Donald Trump and his old nemesis, Spy magazine:

Trump flatly denies he ever signed a 64-cent check, a 32-cent check, or a 16-cent check, "and I would like them to try and show it to me."
From Radar Online today, pulled from the pages of Spy:
Perhaps The Donald was being Clintonian? It's a 13-cent check. Trump Fingers Spy 'Failure' [NYP] Full Court Press [Radar Online]