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Live From the Imperial City: Kurt Andersen on Super Tuesday

Barack Obama
I just came home from my neighborhood polling place in Brooklyn with my daughter, who turned 18 two weeks ago. She was excited to be voting for the first time — and for the first time in a very long while, I was excited to be voting as well. (Full disclosure: Obama.) There hasn't been an election this interesting in my sentient lifetime, and I've never followed a campaign as closely. Maybe it's the same for you. I'll be back online by 8:30 or so to blog in real time — about the election results, about the coverage of the election results, about my excitements and disappointments as the night grinds on. The polls in California don't close until eleven eastern time, so I expect I'll be jabbering here until midnight EST or later. So let me quote Margot Channing: "Fasten your seatbelts, it's going to be a bumpy night."

Wilmer Valderama, Marquee, Apparently Both Still Alive

Wilmer Marquee
The only thing worse than being on an e-mail list where you get spammed with invitations to Wilmer Valderama's birthday party at Marquee (aren't they both 70 years old by now?) is being on an e-mail list where you get spammed with invitations that are ALSO pleas to join a summer share in the Hamptons. "Please contact us if you'd like to do a Hamptons Share this summer!" read the chipper text of the e-mail that came with the invitation here. Wilmer Valderama? Sharing a house with people you don't know? Trashy, overcrowded nightclubs? Wow, whoever these Rachel and Adam people are, we have to hand it to them. They've done the impossible: They made us look outside and thank the heavens that it is dark and sleeting out there. Summer, and the Hamptons, can not come slow enough for us. Hamptons Holidays [Official Site]

Kellog’s Diner at Risk; the Definitive Banana Book

Cobble Hill: Trader Joe's seems to think it's opening a store on Court Street, even if a bunch of local bloggers don't. [McBrooklyn] Dumbo: Finally, the map to area eateries we’ve all been waiting for. [Gridskipper] East Village: Want to read a book about bananas? Dan Keoppel reads tonight at KGB from Banana: The Fate of the Fruit That Changed the World. Fort Greene: Neighbors are looking for a friendly bar to watch Super Tuesday results. [General Greene] Gowanus: Vandals have opened up the Whole Foods site on 3rd Street again. [Gowanus Lounge] Jackson Heights: Sweet tooths rejoice over Cannelle Pâtisserie on 31st Avenue. [Chow] Park Slope: Komboocha, a fermented tea, hits the co-op, but not everyone is psyched about it: “It’s expensive, tastes like crap, and claims to cure everything. Thus, it appeals to the rich and those addicted to Park Slopish consumer culture.” [Daily Slope] Williamsburg: According to renderings, Kellog's Diner will be wrapped up by a heinous new condo at Metropolitan and Union. [Curbed]

Breaking: Medical Emergency at the Tents!

Our diligent correspondent reports: "They're saying a person is having heart palpitations — not sure who it is, but they're not letting anyone past check-in. I can hear sirens, but I assume they're not going to send paramedics in through the front."

Holy Grail of Japanese Knives Can Be Found Downtown

The conjunction in the last few days of a Salon article and a Discovery documentary about the greatest living Japanese knife-maker, Keijiro Doi, and his fiery arts has had chefs buzzing around town. Most all of them fetishize Japanese knives: The Salon article name-checks Thomas Keller, Jean Georges, Eric Ripert, and David Bouley. But the commanding figure in the article is Doi, and it so happens that the only place in America where you can actually buy the 80-year-old blacksmith’s legendary creations is here, at Korin Trading Company downtown. Korin sells a $4,720 yanagi, or sashimi knife, although it is so rare it isn’t even on the company’s Website, as well as a lesser yanagi, a bargain at $720. Korin founder Saori Kawano tells us that Doi inspired her to found the company, the premier Japanese-knife story in America, as a way to honor Japanese knife-smithing.