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In Which Everyone Has Second Thoughts

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• The jury is hopelessly deadlocked in the much-covered case of the Long Island samurai-sword murder. The defense's version — that the victim's wife, not the accused stepson, wielded the sword — has apparently raised enough reasonable doubt. [Newsday] • The city's phasing out five low-performing high schools, two in Manhattan and three in Brooklyn. Alumni, shed a tear for dear old Lafayette, Samuel Tilden, South Shore, Urban Peace Academy, and High School for the Physical City (um, huh?). [NYP] • In ever odder education news, City College has named a student center after Assata Shakur — an erstwhile Black Liberation Army militant and convicted cop killer currently residing in Cuba. Some people are less than thrilled. [NYDN] • Mayor Bloomberg is expected to make a "major speech" on sustainability today, which is a big deal in certain wonkish circles. Bloomie will be outlining the city's land-use and traffic goals through the year 2030, when we'll probably all be under water anyway. [Streetsblog] • And remember how Taco Bell said green onions were the source of E. coli and very publicly removed them from the menu? Yeah, well, it was the white onions, mislabeled at the lab. And wait, there's more — the strain of the bacteria found on those was not even the one that caused the local outbreak. Bon appetit. [NYT]

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Lurid, Infected, Leering

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• A gruesome murder-suicide in Brooklyn left four dead and almost redefines "lurid." Investigators believe an ex-con bludgeoned to death his girlfriend (who was also his half-sister), killed her two children, then overdosed on the scene. [WNBC] • A former NY1 reporter says she was sexually harassed at work and fired for complaining about it. Among other things, a colleague Photoshopped giant breasts on her photo, which apparently passes for a joke at NY1. [NYP] • E. coli is here! The first registered NYC patient (who has already recovered) is a Staten Islander who got the bug, like the other 60 victims, by eating at a local Taco Bell. [amNY] • The Daily News is shocked to learn that about 70 percent of recent subway graffiti has been made by European kids looking for an "authentic" NYC experience. Next they'll tell us those guys on Astor Place are not real punks. [NYDN] • And the Times ponders the rise of "experiential marketing" in Times Square, wherein companies do something moderately freaky and hope tourists will photograph it and/or blog about it. Here at Daily Intel, we would never fall for such gimmicks. [NYT]

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Bloomberg Succeeds in Prying Guns From Warm, Live Hands

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• Bloomberg's novel anti-gun initiative — going after out-of-state dealers — is paying off. (It also shows an unusually, um, national-minded thinking from a city mayor). Six gun stores in outlying states have agreed to let court officials monitor their sales; twelve more are being sued into agreement. [NYT] • The Daily News has a cover story that would drive O. Henry to suicide: A Staten Island woman gets the news of her fiancé's death in Iraq, followed two hours later by a FedExed engagement ring from him. We don't normally fall for the human-face-of-war stuff from our tabs, but Christ. [NYDN] • D.J. Carl Blaze of Power 105.1 is in the hospital after getting shot "at least 13 times." The details are murky, and the shooter took Blaze's $20,000 gold chain, but the hail of bullets appears far too excessive for a robbery. [NYP] • A Brooklyn rabbi was cuffed and jailed on child-molestation charges last night, after the lawsuit against him made the papers earlier in the week. The alleged victim is a 9-year-old who claims to have been abused for two years. Neighbors say the rabbi "doesn't fit the criteria." [WNBC] • Demolition is set to begin in a couple of hours on the iconic, conical Revere Sugar Refinery in Red Hook. Thor Equities, which is also building on the Williamsburg-Greenpoint and Coney Island waterfronts, snatched up the factory in a less-publicized deal for $40 million. [amNY]

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Everything Good Is Bad for You

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• A massive, almost Gangs of New York–style group fight in the unlikeliest of settings — Union Square's Greenmarket — left one teenager dead. The two bands of high-school rivals, numbering around 50, wielded "canes, belts, fists and more." Another teen is in serious condition at St. Vincent's with multiple stab wounds. [WNBC] • Vegetables are bad for you, part two: Two more Taco Bells closed, both on Long Island, amid region-wide E. coli poisonings (99 to date and counting). The infection has been traced, surprisingly, to the scallions the company sprinkles atop its ground mystery meat. [amNY] • Reading is bad for you: P.S. 150 in Queens is pulling a young-adult book about coming out, a poetry collection that uses naughty words, and other titles. [NYDN] • Tishman Speyer, taking a break from its historic buying spree, casually set another record by selling 666 Fifth Avenue — which the company bought six years ago for about $500 million — to the Kushner family for $1.8 billion, the largest sum ever paid for a single building. [NYT] • And the Times runs a thoughtful piece about the perils of taking the little ones to Broadway shows. In a case of unfortunate placement, however, the article is rendered unbelievably gross by its proximity to another report: "Broadway Actor Denies Sex Charge." Yet another peril. [NYT]

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A Bad Day for All Things Trans

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• The Board of Health has backed off the much-publicized proposal to let people change the gender on their birth certificates nearly at will, without having necessarily gone under the knife. The ultraprogressive policy would run afoul of new federal regulations, due next year. Once again, being first doesn't pay off. [NYT] • The Reverend Al Sharpton and other black and Latino leaders say they want to stage a pre-Christmas march down Fifth Avenue, from Plaza Hotel to Herald Square, to protest the 50-bullet police shooting of Sean Bell. Bell's relatives will lead the procession. [NYDN] • Broadway's James Barbour (Beauty and the Beast, Urinetown) is hauled in on sexual-assault charges. If nothing else, this easily trumps yesterday's news that a guy with a Law & Order credit was sticking up drugstores. [NYP] • Eagle-eyed MTA budget-watchers noticed an odd expenditure: In the last four years, the authority has spent $102,009 on tailor's bills. The culprit: a weirdly shaped armrest on LIRR and Metro-North trains, prone to ripping passengers' pants. [AP via amNY] • And in what's clearly the Times' grossest "Metro" item of the day, a must-read local-color piece trails undiscriminating diners as they grapple with the Taco Bell E. coli scare. Money quote: "I ordered from the Pizza Hut side of the menu because I can't take any chances." [NYT]

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Hillary for President!

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• OMG. Hillary Clinton is — you're not gonna believe this — totally running for president. She said so to a "New York lawmaker" on the phone, and he told the Post. Her declaration? "I'm really going to go for this." OMG. [NYP] • Yesterday in Astor-ia: In finalizing the settlement long settled, Anthony Marshall was cleared of abuse allegations concerning his 104-year-old mother, Brooke Astor. He and his wife still need to return over $11 million in "gifts." Oh, and his lawyer was docked 10 percent of his six-figure fee for chatting to the press. [NYDN] • Thirty-nine people in New York and New Jersey are now down with E. coli, all traceable to a single Taco Bell in South Plainfield, New Jersey. Some of the joint's employees are sick as well. And the marketers of Fast Food Nation are really wishing this happened two weeks ago. [NYT] • Crews will take another tug at the ol' Intrepid, currently stuck in cementlike silt on its way to a dry dock where it was supposed to be getting a spruce-up. The path is reportedly clear now that a Navy contractor has ladled out some of the gunk from under the ship's stern (for $3 million). [amNY] • And in an irresistible police-blotter item, a man is arrested for a series of shop, hotel, and drug-store robberies wherein he'd open his coat to reveal a dynamite-stick belt (actually highway flares). Inventive but unsurprising, considering the perp is an actor with Law & Order on his resume. (Duh-dum.) [WNBC]

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That's Al, Folks

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• Eliot Spitzer, in his waning days as attorney general, is set to release a "devastating indictment" of Alan Hevesi that will almost surely lead to the comptroller's fast resignation, says the Post. Sources tell the tabloid that the AG report will also serve as the cue for a criminal case. [NYP] • Meanwhile, Hillary Clinton, before departing for Washington, got together with Spitzer for a "two-hour strategy session" to discuss, we don't know, the Giants or something. Pundits tie the bustle to Barack Obama's early presidential "maybe." [NYDN, NYT] • In a real-estate listing to end all listings, the penthouse triplex of the Pierre Hotel can be yours, ballroom and all. For $70 million. [NYT] • There's an E. coli outbreak in New Jersey, with about nineteen cases reported. Eleven of the victims had eaten at a Taco Bell in South Plainfield, which has since "voluntarily" closed. That's strange; we didn't know they served spinach. [amNY] • And, in more before-breakfast news, Health Department inspectors are cracking down on illegal meats. Confiscated recently from various New York stores: armadillo fillets, iguana, cow lungs, "smoked rodent," and — our favorite — "unidentified red meat." [AP via Taipei Times]

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Real-Estate Developers to Middle Class: Drop Dead

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• The NYPD has made six arrests in its hunt for "the fourth man" from the scene of the Queens shooting that killed Sean Bell. The dragnet, which involved cops raiding houses in the middle of the night and picking people up on unrelated gun charges, infuriated the already jittery community; the surviving victims' attorney says the fourth man doesn't exist. [NYDN] • First Stuy Town and now Starrett City. The subsidized Brooklyn megacomplex (140 acres, 46 towers, 5,881 apartments, 14,000 residents) is up for sale. The enclave, which has its own schools and even its own newspaper, is expected to fetch over $1 billion. [NYT] • The populist Post sides squarely with the riders on the cab-fare issue, insisting the new hike boosts fares up to 27 percent instead of the promised average of 11 percent. Which is not to say the paper wasn't indignant about the 11 percent, too. [NYP] • MTA head honcho Peter Kalikow is making noises about stepping down from his post in mid-2007, despite having five more years left in the term. (Spitzer wants him out.) The always-gracious Roger Toussaint responds by saying "even six months is too long." [amNY] • Oh, and you don't cross Kalikow and not pay for it. Here you go, NYC — no subway cell service for you! [amNY]

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Cha-Ching

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• Where did that come from? The city now projects a $1.9 billion surplus — its largest ever — for the fiscal year that began in July, citing an awesome real-estate market and "sound management decisions" by the mayor. A City Council member even uttered the words "tax cuts." Keep talking. [amNY] • The police have identified the fourth man who was in the car on the receiving end of NYPD's 50-bullet hailstorm. There's a chance, they say, that the witness may have run off with a gun; he thus appears to be the cops' last hope to somehow justify the shooting. Meanwhile, survivor Joseph Guzman, shot eleven times, denies from the hospital bed having any weapons (according, it must be said, to Al Sharpton). [NYDN] • Say hi to the much-discussed taxi-fare hike: "Wait time" is now 40 cents a minute, not 20. Count on a temporary cab shortage, as most cars spend the day in line to get their meters adjusted (earning nothing in the meantime). [Newsday] • Governor Pataki and Governor-elect Spitzer both came out in favor of downsizing New York's hospitals (we're about to lose five in the city, nine statewide). The only real news in that sentence is Spitzer's pronouncement, as Pataki was behind the whole initiative to begin with. "The commissioners did an outstanding job," the Times quotes Pataki saying — via satellite from, of all places, Kuwait. We didn't know they had an early primary. [NYT] • And this, from the Department of Unenforceable Ordinances: Starting tomorrow, the City Council will make it illegal to toss rechargeable batteries in the trash. The toxic, cadmium-filled things must go back to the manufacturer for recycling. For the remedy — a $50 fine — to kick in, the violator has to be literally caught in the act, the likelihood of which strikes us as extremely slight. [NYP]

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Caiman Island

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• The 2008 battle lines are just being drawn, and already they look ugly. Richard Collins, a principal donor to Rudy Giuliani's political action committee, also turns out to be the main man behind Stop Her Now: a PAC devoted to tainting the presidential prospects of Guess Who. While not illegal, the situation is ever-so-slightly uncouth, especially as Collins has taken to describing himself as Stop Her Now's "chairman." [NYT] • Seems Mike Bloomberg may actually be overdoing the anti-cop stance after the Queens 50-bullet shooting. The mayor said that the cops should face a Queens jury — a reference to the Albany trial in the Diallo case; the statement didn't sit too well with the officers' families, since there aren't even any indictments yet. Everyone else kinda loves the Angry Populist Mike, though. [NYP] • The belt-tightening program for the New York State health industry, created by a Pataki-led panel, has finally released its report, and the plan would shut down five hospitals in NYC, eliminating 7,000 jobs. City Hall calls the proposal "reasonable," and Spitzer isn't commenting. The rest of us will try extra hard to stay healthy. [NYDN] • Not that anyone expected otherwise, but Coney Island's Astroland Amusement Park has been sold to a huge developer, Thor Equities. The original owners, the Albert family, will keep the octogenarian Cyclone. The rest of the park will close after the 2007 season for "renovations," which we somehow doubt include an expanded Shoot the Freak pavilion. [NYDN, amNY] • And, it wasn't exactly a crocodile in a sewer, but a two-foot caiman in a cardboard box is close enough. The cops found the "feisty," in their words, reptile abandoned on a Brooklyn street. In a lovely touch of local color, its jaws were kept shut via a double-knotted sneaker shoelace. [AP via IHT]

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The Inexplicables

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• Mayor Bloomberg seems to be making all the right moves in the wake of the 50-bullet NYPD hailstorm that killed an unarmed man in Queens. The mayor called the shooting "unacceptable or inexplicable" during a meeting with the city's black leaders (including Al Sharpton and Charlie Rangel) — unusually strong language considering that all the facts aren't officially in yet. [NYT] • Firefighters doused a fire in the basement of a Bed-Stuy apartment only to find a man's body duct-taped to a bed. It's unclear whether the flame killed the victim or was intended to hide the crime. [WNBC] • Even the most radical proponents of graffiti-as-legit-art would have a hard time defending one Patrick McCormick, whose fifteen arrests alternate between graffiti offenses (his artless tag, seen all over town, is "MAP") and things like robberies and the murder of homeless people. He is now back behind bars after pleading guilty to a relatively mild crime of smashing a subway window with a hammer. What a guy. [NYDN] • In Trenton, the heirs of a wealthy couple that donated $35 million to Princeton in 1961 want the money back. Their reasoning hinges on a claim, which they're taking to court, that the university is misusing the endowment. It's safe to say there goes that honorary degree. [NYP] • And the Whitney is jumping on the High Line: The museum has inked a tentative deal with the city to build a downtown expansion that will also function as the entrance to the trippy park. This appears to mean that all talk of expanding its uptown space is now officially over, and the meatpacking district has ornery UES landmarks boards to thank. [amNY]

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Bad News and Bad News

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• After undercover cops fired 50 rounds into a group of unarmed bachelor-party revelers at a Queens nightclub, killing the groom, the five officers involved are on leave and stripped of their guns; crowds demanded more action against them at an angry Sunday vigil. The situation is developing fast, with new witnesses coming to the fore. [NYP, WNBC (on new witnesses), NYDN (on the emotional toll), NYT ("experts offer theory")] • Incidentally, the trial is about to begin in a callous murder of two undercover policemen back in March 2003. The officers were killed execution style while attempting to buy a handgun from a Staten Island dealer. [amNY] • New York's health sector could lose thousands of jobs thanks to a report coming tomorrow. That's when a state commission is expected to release a list of belt-tightening measures, including the downsizing of hospital and nursing-home staffs across the board. In a rare provision, only the whole plan can be rejected or accepted by the governor — no picking and choosing. [NYT] • A 73-year-old Park Avenue rabbi is being sued by his mistress for a breach of the "cohabitation contract" the lovers signed at the outset of their seven-year affair. The paper demanded liposuction and continuing education from her (she complied) and fidelity from both sides (he evidently didn't). [NYP] • And, the future of dry cleaning is now: A fully automated "ADM," currently testing in the Bronx (uh, okay), will now mangle your clothes and singe off the buttons just like the real thing. [NYDN]

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No Thanks

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• The police blotter shows no intention of taking a holiday. In the West Village, a New Yorker's after-dark nightmare came to life when a woman hailing a taxi was kidnapped and raped by the three men who offered her a ride. The nearby NYU dorm is abuzz with freaked-out students exchanging stories. [NYP] • And in this heartwarming Thanksgiving bit, an estranged gay son came home to reestablish contact with his Brooklyn parents; what he found was Dad's bones, which the mother had squirreled away to continue picking up his Social Security checks. [NYDN] • So much for the fantasy Spielberg offered in The Terminal: A judge rules that a Harlem grocery clerk's deportation to Somalia shouldn't be affected by the fact that Somalia, well, has no government and is currently kinda-sorta run by an Islamist junta. The deportee's pro bono lawyer is furious. [NYT] • In what's shaping up as the worst week in race relations since Katrina, MTA executive Gary Dellaverson stands accused of racism after joking to the reporters that he was "putting needles in [his] Roger Toussaint doll." Al Sharpton is already calling for Dellaverson's resignation, saying — and we quote — the remark was "the same as if he said, 'I want to stick pins in my Al Sharpton watermelon.'" Except that actually, Al, no, it's not. [amNY] • And just to break up the relentless gloom of today's news, the Black Eyed Peas won three American Music Awards. Wait, that's just as depressing as the other ones. [Newsday]

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Goya, Oh, Boy-a!

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• The female victim of yesterday's strange shooting died. The attacked couple, who share a cul-de-sac with the Clintons in Chappaqua, were supposedly run off the road in an ambush. The husband, a disbarred lawyer, is in the hospital; cops are finding his account of the events somewhat odd; and we're getting a queasy feeling that we'll be returning to this story quite a bit. [WNBC] • Good news: New York State's top court has green-lighted an almost $2 billion increase in funding for New York City's schools. Bad news: Lower courts had ruled the city deserved $4.7 billion. Squaring the ruling with campaign pledges to boost funding much further is Spitzer's first homework assignment. [NYT] • Now that Citigroup is paying the Mets $20 million a year to call the new ballpark Citi Field, the MTA wants in. The Daily News reports that the authority is in talks with the Citi people about renaming the closest subway stop. In other news, meet our new cat Citi. We prefer cash. [NYDN] • Not sure whether Michael Richards's appalling comedy-club outburst was our territory — he is, after all, only a fictional New Yorker — but am New York made him a cover story today, so there you go: TV's Kramer is a racist and sucks at shutting down hecklers. Also, he was weird on Letterman. Video, etc. Blech. [amNY] • The stolen Goya is back! The FBI recovered 1778's Children With a Cart, stolen two weeks ago in Pennsylvania, after a New Jersey man recognized the painting "from media coverage." And not just because it was, you know, a Goya. In New Jersey. [NYP]

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Attacks, Affairs, and VFW Fundraisers

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• A Westchester married couple who live on the Clintons' cul-de-sac were ambushed and shot on their way to their Chappaqua home Saturday night. Both remain in the hospital. Suspects abound; the husband, Carlos Perez-Olivo, is a high-profile lawyer recently disbarred amid accusations of incompetence. [amNY] • The Post breaks out the dollar sign for "McLaughlin's 'Lavi$hed' Lady," about a spa operator whom married assemblyman and labor leader Brian McLaughlin reportedly romanced. Add this to the already epic list of his malfeasances, which, we'll never tire of reminding you, included stealing from the Little League. [NYP] • In a Coen brothers movie come to life, four masked gunmen held up a poker fund-raiser at a VFW hall in Franklin Square, Long Island, and took the game's pot. The robbers also helped themselves to the guests' wallets and cell phones. They'd even, evidently, cased the joint before. [WNBC] • In media-on-media news, we'll note the Daily News' Stanley Crouch telling young black men to grow up. Filming a "popular program for black youths," the columnist found himself "surrounded by black men, ages 18 to 35, and I was appalled. As a father with a daughter nearly 30 years old who has never been close to marrying anyone, I was once more struck by what my offspring describes as 'a lack of suitable men.'" [NYDN] • And in a bit of media-on-media-on-media news, TVNewser comes in for its big New York Times close-up, executed along the usual narrative lines of "OMG kid with blog" and "Isn't this what the Web was invented for." To its credit, the Times also gets a great quote from the game Brian Williams, who compares the blogger to The King of Comedy's Rupert Pupkin. [NYT]

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Hevesi Looking for New Car, Job

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• Reelected or not, Alan Hevesi may be on his way out, and soon: The Times reports that governor-elect Eliot Spitzer will most likely be asking the State Senate to remove the wife-chauffeuring comptroller. Spitzer then gets to hand-pick and name his ex-ally's successor. [NYT] • At least Hevesi reimbursed the state for the misused 88 grand. It's less clear how we get back the $1.3 million NYPD spent fighting bicycles — that's right, bicycles. That's how much money the recent crackdown on the annual Critical Mass bike ride cost, according to an economist who tracks cops' expenditures. [Streetsblog] • Lest you think the police are only battling hippies on bikes, the NYPD issued a somewhat bizarre, 2002-style scare statement telling business owners to be "on the lookout" for female jihadists who can "hide explosives by faking pregnancy or sweet-talk their way past security officers." Finally, a glorious merging of xenophobia and misogyny. Better check if their breasts are real, too! [NYDN] • In a lurid Post front-pager, a Brooklyn man caught a cemetery caretaker urinating into a vase on his grandmother's grave and got into a scuffle with him. The Post then proceeds to piss puns all over story, including "'Relief' Grief" and "Mourner Pee-ved." [NYP] • The rival Daily News, meanwhile, does an impressive job smearing Rupert Murdoch — and by extension the Post — with Nicole Brown Simpson's blood; at least four indignant items are devoted to the Fox TV special and HarperCollins book wherein O.J. flippantly what-ifs the murders. [NYDN]

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Trans-Fat Haters Winning Hearts and Minds

In the fight against trans fats, bad publicity might just do for New York what a protracted legal battle could not. The city's move to ban the deadly oils, which was rolling forward like a hungry man heading toward a bodega for chiccarones, seems to have been stopped in its tracks, or at least slowed, according this Crain's story referenced in yesterday's Morning Line. Part of the reason might be the prospect of a long and costly war with Ronald's army, which we outlined earlier. But even without being regulated, companies are tripping over each other to abandon the good stuff. KFC took the hint weeks ago. Taco Bell just saw the light, and earlier this week, the Girl Scouts got on board the zero-trans-fats train. At this rate, they might not have to pass the law at all. Except for McDonald's, of course.

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Small Victories

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• Holy crap, could this be …? It is! There is actual construction afoot at ground zero — and on the Freedom Tower, no less. The steel cage defines the areas where elevators and stairwells will go; the pouring of concrete starts tomorrow. And if we'd seen this, oh, let's see, four and a half years ago, we'd probably burst with pride. [NYT] • In case you want to relive the glory of last Tuesday: A Democratic congressional candidate in Connecticut WON! WON! WON! the recount against his GOP opponent, a three-term incumbent. "Landslide Joe" (hey, he nicknamed himself) Courtney's sweeping mandate is now officially based on a 91-vote advantage. [NYT] • NYC's Board of Health might take things slower with the trans-fat ban. It may also give it a form other than a piece of City Council legislation, lest the city be hit with a ton of lawsuits. McDonald's, by the way, says it will totally comply (even as it's hiring new high-profile lawyers). [Crain's] • A fired media executive is in deep trouble for being a good Samaritan, of sorts. Stevan Hoffacker was allegedly monitoring the company's e-mail traffic from his home PC in Queens and sending colleagues heads-up messages if they were about to get canned as well. The bosses at SourceMedia must have been puzzled by all the prescient "You can't fire me, I quit" storm-offs. [NYDN] • And alleged phone-thrower Naomi Campbell is looking for a plea deal but won't take anything that will require her to do cleanup duty (the court-mandated humiliation du jour for errant celebrities). "It's not that she's squeamish," her lawyer is quoted saying — and trailing off directly afterward. [NYP]

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Crimes and Misdemeanors

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• Yesterday's already depressing story — a Brooklyn mother leaped in front of the F train, and survived, shortly after her son was found dead in their apartment — continues in the maximally depressing way possible. The woman has admitted to killing the boy, saying "demons overtook" her. [NYP] • On the lighter side of the police blotter, Naomi Campbell's arrest warrant kicks in today, should she fail to appear at Manhattan Criminal Court for a hearing about her latest alleged phone-throwing ways. Campbell has already missed the previous hearing; her lawyer says he's considering a plea bargain. [ITV] • This one could have ended badly. A pilot landed his Cessna in the middle of a city park. Paul Dudley was heading to New Jersey's Linden airport when he heard the engine sputter and decided to land in Brooklyn, coming to a leisurely stop in a field near the Verrazano Bridge. [amNY] • NBC is cutting costs and cleaning house, laying off about twenty people across its flagship news programs (Today, Dateline, and Nightly News) and reportedly readying to shed twenty more. Dateline, which has been faring worst in the ratings, took the deepest hit. [NYT] • And the City Council is proposing a law that could send parents to jail on a misdemeanor charge for kids' drinking. One wouldn't have to actually serve alcohol to a minor to be liable; turning a blind eye would suffice. Hey, kids — another way to get even with Dad: Rat him out with one drunken phone call! [NYDN]

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Hizzoner for Prez!

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• Rudy Giuliani is absolutely positively running in '08, the papers say, unless he's not. The ex-mayor formed an exploratory committee, registering it, intriguingly, with New York State instead of the Federal Elections Commission (this limits public access to the findings). So how long before Bernie Kerik somehow screws this one up? [NYP, NYDN] • From the police blotter, a murky drama in Brooklyn: A mother leaped onto subway tracks in front of the F train shortly after the police found her son dead in the family's apartment. She survived; the authorities are investigating how the boy died. [WNBC] • For those keeping track: The Intrepid is still stuck in Hudson River mud; the first attempt at budging it failed; now a new round of dredging begins. The ship's keel and propellers are reportedly encased in an "almost concrete-like" sediment. And the next highest tide is not until December. [amNY] • Looks like the upcoming Spanish exhibit at the Guggenheim is going to be a Goya short. The painting Children With a Cart was stolen somewhere near Scranton, Pennsylvania, while making its way to New York from Toledo (the one in Ohio). The FBI is on the case, which is to say they're soliciting tips. [NYT] • And in other painting-mishap news, it will only cost Steve Wynn $85,000 to repair the damage caused when he put his elbow through Picasso's Le Reve. The gaffe's witnesses, by the way, included Barbara Walters and Nora Ephron. So we'd expect Tom Hanks to soon be stumbling through a Pollack or something at a theater near you, on his way to meeting Meg Ryan. [AP via Yahoo]

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