Displaying all articles tagged:

Urban Planning

  1. global tech
    Good ‘Smart Cities’ Actually Need People to Live in ThemThis is a surprisingly difficult thing for urban developers to do.
  2. cityscape
    Why New York City Should Welcome Electric Scooters on Its StreetsHow can anyone detest these things? They are simple, cheap, and slightly goofy. Best of all, they could help us get rid of cars.
  3. A Year Has Passed Since the Grenfell Tower Fire. It Could Happen Again Anytime.This was murder by negligent bureaucracy. Preventing the next one begins with stronger regulation.
  4. Nashville Is Supposed to Be the Model Walkable 21st-Century City. Not Quite.A walkable downtown that’s still pretty car-dependent.
  5. The Bright Future of Citi BikeAfter five years, the system is nimble and popular, and costs the taxpayer nothing — and still has the power to transform the city.
  6. The New Ferry Fleet Will Be Delightful, and Is Also a Huge MistakeSix hundred million dollars is way too much for such a tiny number of riders.
  7. Superhuman City: A Walk Through Hudson YardsHudson Yards, a mega-neighborhood built from scratch, comes into view.
  8. This Time, a Much More Promising Attempt to Fix the FrickA plan that looks far subtler and less invasive than its predecessors.
  9. What New York Should Learn From the Park Slope Crash That Killed Two ChildrenMost of these not-really-accidental events are preventable by steps more powerful than telling people to “be careful.”
  10. How Can It Take 15 Years and $32 Million to Build a Neighborhood Library?We’re getting better public buildings, but not without a big downside.
  11. Why You Should Be in Favor of Congestion Pricing in New YorkYes, it’s annoying to be taxed for something that always appeared to be free. Get over it.
  12. The Death of a SkyscraperWhat does it mean for New York if a Wall Street bank knocks down a historic building to harvest some tax incentives?
  13. The Megamall–Hotel–Condo–Concert Hall That Ate New York CityTime Warner Center and the West Side it made.
  14. The Regional Plan Association Would Like to Close the Subways All NightAnd add glass partitions and gates to keep people from falling onto the tracks.
  15. Casting a Skeptical Eye on the AT&T Building RenovationRipping off a lot of the granite skin is not the answer to the problems afflicting 550 Madison Avenue.
  16. Bill de Blasio, New York’s Putterer-in-ChiefA mayor who contents himself with piling up small achievements instead of making sweeping change.
  17. New Plans for the Domino Sugar Complex, RevealedA first look at Vishaan Chakrabarti’s plans for the former Domino Sugar factory in Williamsburg.
  18. The Views (Real and Virtual) From Cornell TechRoosevelt Island’s new campus looks out at the city and beyond.
  19. A Basic Device Can Prevent a Barcelona-Style Attack. Why Not Use It More?Bollards, strategically deployed, can foil terrorist techniques.
  20. This New York City Housing Project Works. What’s Different About Ocean Bay?This complex in the Rockaways was rebuilt and is clean, well-maintained, and safe.
  21. How an Overlooked Urban Design Feature Helped Stop the Times Square DriverIt’s time to start thinking more aggressively about protecting people on foot in cities.
  22. Are American Cities in Crisis?In his new book, longtime urban optimist Richard Florida appears worried.
  23. Trump Tower, Fifth Avenue, and the Militarization of Urban Public SpaceTrump’s election has turned his stretch of Fifth into the urban equivalent of the security line at JFK.
  24. To Honor Jane Jacobs’s Vision, We Need More Planning, Not LessA pair of new books reminds us to look at her streetscape with clear eyes.
  25. The Urban Designer Who Brought Whimsy to London Is Turning His Eye to New YorkThomas Heatherwick is the Willy Wonka of Hudson Yards.
  26. When Will New York City Sink?A city in climate-change denial.
  27. Researchers at MIT Are Using Lego Blocks to Plan CitiesThese aren’t your ordinary Lego blocks.
  28. 8 Creative Ways Cities Are Combating Rising TemperaturesFrom street spritzes in Japan to man-made wind in the Middle East.
  29. Can Downtown Brooklyn Become Walkable?Brooklyn Strand, a new de Blasio development plan, aims to connect patchy greenspace into a walkable urban utopia — if it ever gets built.
  30. De Blasio’s Affordable-Housing Plan Is His Obamacare: Imperfect But MonumentalAn ambitious, difficult scheme to help people who really need it.
  31. Why the Brooklyn-Queens Streetcar Is the Folly We NeedA skeptic gets (partly) won over by a new proposal.
  32. Gowanus Canal Is Getting a ‘Sponge Park’ to Make It Slightly Less Toxic It will at least help block some new contaminants from flowing into the canal when it rains.
  33. urban planning
    Heel-Friendly Sidewalk Grates Will Save Shoes, LivesMaking New York a more walkable city for people who walk in heels.
  34. Welcome to the Age of Shadowless Skyscrapers New building designs cast soft, glare-free pools of light instead of patches of darkness.
  35. Exclusive: Chakrabarti Leaves SHoP, Sets Up ShopPremier urbanist and architect goes solo.
  36. Hunters Point South Should Be the New Gold Standard for Affordable HousingHow do we get more like that?
  37. How to Solve NYC’s Rude-Cyclist ProblemPublic shaming is tempting. But there might be a better answer.
  38. Is NYC Doing Enough to Prepare for Rising Seas?What our urban future might look like, whether or not the climate predictions prove true.
  39. When Will de Blasio See the Light on Parks?The mayor is ignoring one of the most cost-effective ways of easing New Yorkers’ lives, irrespective of income.
  40. High Bridge Reopens the Bronx to Pedestrian PowerBusting through the barbed wire.
  41. Which New York Is Yours?Talking to Jeremiah Moss of Vanishing New York and Nikolai Fedak of New York YIMBY, 50 years after the Landmark Law.
  42. In Terms of Affordable Housing, Queens Is de Blasio’s Last Best HopeThe mayor can’t de-gentrify hot zones. What he can do is pump city money into middle-class safe zones in Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx.
  43. What Bloomberg Associates Can Learn From Mexico CityBloomberg might fantasize about cleaning up the chaos, but he ought to study what’s already been accomplished.
  44. Urban Planners Agree: New York in 2030 Will SuckPlanning to stick around town for the next 23 years? You might want to reconsider … Apparently the New York of 2030 — the major American city at the second-greatest risk of catastrophic hurricane damage after Miami, by the way — will be facing a homelessness epidemic, more Miss Brooklyn–esque way-out-of-scale enormous buildings over rail yards, a major shortage of engineers qualified to construct such things, and a war between the union and nonunion laborers who build them. These were the lessons of last night’s NYC 2030 planning meeting, which opened with a cheery presentation by Bloomberg’s sustainability czar, Rohit Aggarwala, who has the task of preparing a 2030 blueprint by March, and had come to urban-planning experts for volunteer brainstorming. It turned out to be presumably not the brainstorming he was hoping for.
  45. Group Wants to Shape Up New Yorkers, New York The Public Health Association of New York City has a new report out, and it’s a jaw-dropper. The problem it identifies — only one quarter of us get enough physical activity — is not all that newsworthy; we already knew that New Yorkers, once you get past yoga-crazed downtowners and the Chelsea iron-pumping contingent, are not exactly gym bunnies. What’s staggering about the PHANYC report, titled “Steps to Get New Yorkers Moving,” is the sheer scope of its remedy suggestions. The Association offers nothing less than a total reengineering of the city under the fitness flag. Proposals start with the obvious (more bicycle routes), proceed to the novel (“enable parks to directly benefit from the property value and property tax increases they generate”), and finally hit the full, glorious WTF. Apparently PHANYC wants the city to build “step streets” in its hilly parts, line the avenues with trees to make them more inviting for joggers, institute diagonal parking because it’s more pedestrian-friendly, adopt European traffic-calming measures, close certain streets to vehicles, and reduce speed limits. It’s not that we think these things are bad ideas, necessarily; it’s just that the plan seems a bit aggressive. What’s next, trying to ban all bad fats from our diets? Oh, wait. Agenda for a Healthy New York [PHANYC]