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Whitney Museum

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Georgia O’Keeffe’s Startling Abstract Works

Fifteen pieces, including paintings that will surprise even some of her most devoted fans, and several charcoal drawings that first convinced Alfred Stieglitz of her greatness.

By Emma Pearse

Art Crowd Gets Heated at Armory Dance Party

It's hard to have a throwdown in skinny jeans, but on Saturday night at the Whitney Biennial’s 24-hour dance party at the Armory, it happened: The hipsters went wild. The event, the culmination of Agathe Snow’s 96-hour marathon of continuous dance, was cut seven hours short of the goal when, around 4 a.m., a fight erupted mid–dance floor. At first, onlookers thought the scuffle — which began with just handful of fighters and swelled to more than twenty — was an ironic piece of performance art. “I thought they were kidding,” said Eden Mackenzie, a video editor who was on the dance floor when the fists began to fly. “Then they all just started jumping on one guy and punching him as he lay on the ground.” Doreen Remen, co-founder of the Art Production Fund and one of the event’s producers played down the tussle to New York: “It was just two guys, and they were asked to leave,” she said. "It all happened very fast.” But Obinna Izeogu, an art director who attended the party described the scene as a “mini-riot," in which blows were traded for more than fifteen minutes as more partygoers joined in the fray that continued to swell even after D.J.'s killed the tunes (and Snow's vision of infinite dance). “It started off like two and then it just became a rumble,” said Izeogu. Armory security staff, unprompted, dialed 911 for reinforcements, and officers who responded called it “that gigantic fight”.

The Multitasking Buddha

Rudolf Stingel, the art critics' darling whose highly anticipated retrospective opened this weekend at the Whitney, has a funny way of exploring artistic process. While he's best known for his colossal minimalist constructions (Styrofoam "canvases," transformative installations — both of which are on view at the Whitney), we kind of like the look of this multitasking Buddha: a tranquil (though perhaps maniacal) take on artistic apprenticeship.

On the Hunt for J-Vanka at the Whitney Party: Success!

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The world still wonders: Are Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump dating? And so New York's Party Lines team remains on the case, tracking J-Vanka through high-profile parties, looking for signs. At last night's Whitney Art Party in Tribeca, our reporter picked up the scent. What did he find? The short version: They were talking and standing near each other; they left together and were last seen hopping into a chauffeured car and speeding off. The long version, full of detective work, time stamps, evasions, and rediscoveries: It's after the jump (and sort of pruriently delicious).

Tom Wolfe Wants a Bonfire at the Whitney

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Tom Wolfe called the Landmarks Preservation Commission "de facto defunct" in a Times op-ed on Sunday, its members pawns of developer Aby Rosen and his evil plans to build a 30-story glass condo in the Upper East Side Historic District. Then today came news that the Whitney Museum, located in the same historic district and after decades of fighting to build an addition, would give up on its Madison Avenue expansion plan and instead build a "satellite" branch along the High Line in the meatpacking district. So does Wolfe think that this move, finally, is the right stuff? We called to find out. So, Tom, happy that the expansion has been stopped? Everything possible should be done to keep the Whitney from expanding. I mean, we really don't need any more of that, unless they improve in taste. Mainly, they should just get rid of the building. Almost anything they could put in its place, as long as it's no higher than that, would be real plus for the city.

The Inexplicables

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• Mayor Bloomberg seems to be making all the right moves in the wake of the 50-bullet NYPD hailstorm that killed an unarmed man in Queens. The mayor called the shooting "unacceptable or inexplicable" during a meeting with the city's black leaders (including Al Sharpton and Charlie Rangel) — unusually strong language considering that all the facts aren't officially in yet. [NYT] • Firefighters doused a fire in the basement of a Bed-Stuy apartment only to find a man's body duct-taped to a bed. It's unclear whether the flame killed the victim or was intended to hide the crime. [WNBC] • Even the most radical proponents of graffiti-as-legit-art would have a hard time defending one Patrick McCormick, whose fifteen arrests alternate between graffiti offenses (his artless tag, seen all over town, is "MAP") and things like robberies and the murder of homeless people. He is now back behind bars after pleading guilty to a relatively mild crime of smashing a subway window with a hammer. What a guy. [NYDN] • In Trenton, the heirs of a wealthy couple that donated $35 million to Princeton in 1961 want the money back. Their reasoning hinges on a claim, which they're taking to court, that the university is misusing the endowment. It's safe to say there goes that honorary degree. [NYP] • And the Whitney is jumping on the High Line: The museum has inked a tentative deal with the city to build a downtown expansion that will also function as the entrance to the trippy park. This appears to mean that all talk of expanding its uptown space is now officially over, and the meatpacking district has ornery UES landmarks boards to thank. [amNY]