Skip to content, or skip to search.

Skip to content, or skip to search.

Alaska by Float Plane

Splash down in Seward’s Folly for a quick commune with nature.


Pilot a float plane through the Alaskan landscape.  

No state has more trackless wilderness than Alaska, perhaps accounting for the fact that the state also claims the most pilots per capita. Explore the backcountry that rings the gateway city of Anchorage by hopping a De Havilland Beaver or Cessna 206 from the Lake Hood Seaplane Base at Ted Stevens ­airport (dot.alaska.gov/anc), the world’s busiest for float planes (i.e., low-flying, two-to-ten-seater aircrafts in which pontoons sub for landing gear). From there, set your own route with Rust’s Flying ­Service’s “Pilot for a Day” program (from $4,000 for six hours and up to four passengers; flyrusts.com), launching this May. Suggested itineraries include glacier-and-volcano viewing near Mount McKinley or picnicking and whale watching on Prince William Sound. Alternatively, hop a 70-minute Era flight (flyera.com) from Anchorage to Kodiak Island, where you’ll check into the four-cabin, all-inclusive Kodiak Brown Bear Center (from $3,499 per person for three nights; ­kodiakbearcenter.com). Guides at the plush resort lead twice-daily outings by skiff to see indigenous ­Kodiak, as well as foxes and bald eagles, amid the pristine 1.9-million-acre Kodiak National Wildlife ­Refuge. Evenings are best spent sweating in the resort’s wood-stoked banya or listening to loons from beside a crackling fire pit.

The thrill-o-meter: Nobly electrifying.


Advertising
Current Issue
Subscribe to New York
Subscribe

Give a Gift

Advertising