Skip to content, or skip to search.

Skip to content, or skip to search.

New Hampshire by Zip Line

Sail through—er, over—the boating paradise of Lake Winnipesaukee.


Cruise above the trees on a Lake Winnipesaukee zip line.  

Boat culture rules Lake Winnipesaukee, thanks to its 280 miles of shoreline and thousands of motor-boaters, skiers, tubers, and boarders. But there’s a better way to catch a breeze—and get around. Now in its second season, Gunstock Mountain Adventure Park’s ZipTour ($75; 603-293-4341; gunstock.com) is the longest zip-line canopy tour in the continental U.S., with three existing miles of line. Anyone 10 and up can cruise the leafy 8,000-foot descent from summit to base at user-controlled speeds up to 55 miles per hour; views span the coiffed hedges of Romney’s Wolfeboro at the lake’s eastern shore to the neon-lit Weirs Beach. In Lincoln, near Barron Mountain, the twenty lines at Alpine Adventures (603-745-9911; alpinezipline.com) include an off-road thrill ride to the top (from $36) and a newly expanded aerial obstacle course; smaller courses at Monkey Trunks (603-367-4427; monkeytrunks.com), meanwhile, are better for younger children and beginners. Back on Earth, hike the well-maintained trails of Mount Major (NH-11, Alton; hike-nh.com), or if the water looks too good to pass up, go in for a half- or full-day ten-person pontoon rental from Meredith Marina (from $300; 603-279-7921; meredithmarina.com). Head to the always-packed Camp (300 Daniel Webster Hwy., Meredith; 603-279-3003) for gourmet comfort food like deconstructed s’mores in a faux-rustic setting (pine tables, screen doors, moose heads on the walls), then overnight at the Adirondack-style, 57-room hotel Church Landing at Mill Falls (from $249; millfalls.com), with lake views and an in-house spa notably adept at undoing “zip grip.”

The thrill-o-meter: Nobly electrifying.


Advertising
Current Issue
Subscribe to New York
Subscribe

Give a Gift

Advertising