Vets by Specialty

Intro
Dentistry
Cardiology
Neurology
Behavioral Psychology
Dermatology/Allergies
Alternative Medicine
Endocrinology
Laser Declawing
Endoscopy/Ultrasonography
Exotics
Oncology
Respiratory/Gastrointestinal
Opthamology
Surgery
 Urban Strategist
 
New York's veterinary specialists are top dogs in everything from oncology to acupuncture. Here are the best 27 doctors to call for more than just a dry nose.
 
Minty treat? Dentist Dan Carmichael, at the Animal Medical Center.

BY AMY GOLDWASSER, BETSY GOLDBERG, MONICA KHEMSUROV, LIA MEHOS, HILLARY ROSNER, AND ABBY TEGNELIA

PHOTOS BY MAX AGUILERA-HELLWEG
 
We're a city of the pet-obsessed. New Yorkers live with 1 million dogs and 4 million cats — and our pampered darlings have considerably longer lives than their counterparts in the rest of the country. That's partly because we keep them indoors (significantly limiting their contact with cars and raccoons), but also because they receive the finest medical care money can buy. Laser declawing? Root canal? Endoscopic surgery? If your pet needs attention above and beyond what your regular vet can provide, you have the good luck to be living among the top veterinary specialists in the country.

"Just like with people, there's a second level of care," says veterinary neurologist Richard Joseph. Some of the vets on our list of the best specialists in New York are affiliated with the city's veterinary hospitals, but we've also included many private-practice specialists. Every doctor here was nominated by multiple peers, and our list includes both board-certified specialists and general practitioners whose reputations are built on their expertise in a specific field. Among other things, these specialists tend to have access to the most advanced equipment; so the more technologically reliant the field (dentistry, oncology), the more worthwhile a visit to a specialist might be.

Just ask some of the pets that these great specialists have saved, like Oakley, the dog who swallowed a spiky rubber ball; Sammy, the cat who couldn't meow; and Bonkers, the cockatiel who wouldn't stop laying eggs. What do these animals have in common? Owners who can -- and will -- go to great lengths to keep their pets healthy and happy into their golden years. "The oldest cat I've seen was 31," says Paul H. Schwartz, a general practitioner at the Center for Veterinary Care. At first, Schwartz didn't believe the animal's owner. "Then I looked at the record and saw that the cat's name was Groovy."

 
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