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“I felt like a princess in that dress. And I guess I should have felt skinny. We did a lot of dancing that day. ‘Love Is a Many-Splendored Thing’ was our song. Incidentally, I proposed to Stanley. If I’d waited for him to do it, I’d only be celebrating my 25th anniversary this year, not my 50th.” —Dr. Geraldine Chrein, retiree, with husband Stanley Chrein, retiree, married June 1961

Photo: Courtesy of Chrein Family

“We were so broke—the room at the Chelsea was a wedding gift from a friend. It was the perfect place to spend the afternoon. We grabbed a slice for lunch and drank wine in the room. Later we ate empanadas downtown and danced to salsa and reggaeton from the jukebox at a Spanish- American restaurant. Our friends hung Mexican wedding decorations from the pipes. It was everything we could have asked for.” —Jessica Zamora-Turner, stylist assistant, with husband Michael J. Fox, photographer assistant, married February 2010

Photo: Heather Waraksa

“This was a typical canned fifties photo-grapher’s shot of the father telling the daughter how to make her husband happy. That whole day, I remember having this detached feeling, like I was performing in a play. I hadn’t integrated the idea of getting married yet, and here I was getting married. Anyway, it was a very nice play: The props were all nice, and the gentleman involved seemed quite nice. I’m still getting to know him.” Pat Mendlovitz Goldman, retiree, married April 1957

Photo: Courtesy of Pat Mendlovitz Goldman

“My wife and I married for the cause of world peace along with 2,074 other couples in Madison Square Garden, in a ceremony officiated by the Reverend and Mrs. Sun Myung Moon. There was an amazing energy and sense of harmony. We were doing these completely intimate things as an international, interracial collective: ironing wedding gowns, buying rings, suits, and ties, eating meals … and we were all so giddy.”—Tyler Hendricks, religion educator, married July 1982

Photo: Bettmann/Corbis

“We were walking from the ceremony in Brooklyn Bridge Park to the reception two blocks away. I was a little teary-eyed—and happy it was almost over. See, I was a groomzilla: I needed things to be perfect and was so relieved that it went as planned.” Shakeem McMillan, supermarket assistant manager, with wife Ayako Sunakawa-McMillan, project coordinator, married July 2010

Photo: Ayano Hisa Photography

“During my walk down the aisle, I caught three bees in my veil. I’m pretty squeamish about bugs, but on that day I just laughed—it didn’t even occur to me that they could actually sting. Jenny, my sister and maid of honor, lifted my veil to free them, and the ceremony continued. I like to say that I started our marriage with bees in my bonnet.”Angie Lee, marketing VP, married September 2005

Photo: Rob Bennett Weddings

“That’s one of my closest friends in the entire world, Andrew Solomon, hugging me. He’d been with me every single step of the way, from the really tricky beginning of my relationship on to this glorious day. I think he was as excited as I was—and also as relieved. There’s a lot of emotion in that lift.”Dana Cowin, editor-in-chief of Food & Wine magazine, married May 1998

Photo: Courtesy of Dana Cowin

The band was a family from Detroit that just happened to be there playing that day. Qassim and I had only known each other for seven months, but it felt much longer because we had spent 100 hours on the phone before our first date.” —Halima Taha, author, with husband Qassim Ghaffaar, educator, married June 2010

Photo: Ayano Hisa Photography

“This was the only moment of anxiety all day: I was late to make my entrance into the church, and everyone was waiting. The street was empty except for this vibrant stranger, an old lady who was clapping and shouting ‘Congratulations!’ over and over. She made me smile.” Virginia Theofanides, public-relations director, married June 2010

Photo: Image Singulière/Virginie Blachère

“This was one of the most publicly ‘out’ moments in my life. I felt like the city was ours, our future was ours, and we were about to have the party of our lives. And a tiny voice in the back of my head was saying, ‘Don’t get hit by a car!’” Jennifer Johnsen, health editor, with wife Dawn Guarriello, beauty-product developer, married September 2009

Photo: Daniel Krieger Photography

“We were married in the cheese section at Fairway. We had a quartet in the coffee section playing Mendelssohn. Total pandemonium. There were 200 guests blocking the cheese and olive areas all the way across to prepared foods. We divorced amicably [last year]. I prefer dry wines and Arina likes sweet, so there were irreconcilable differences.”Willie Glückstern, German-wine importer, with ex-wife Arina Hinzen, German-winemaker, married December 2000

Photo: Nicole Bengiveno/The New York Times/Redux

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York
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