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“We were just wandering around Chinatown, taking some pictures and making out a little bit. I feel like these guys were looking at us as they would a person peeing on the steps. I love the randomness of New York.” —Rebecca Park Stroy, jewelry designer, and Brandon Stroy, lawyer, married August 2008

Photo: Dave Robbins

“We both had pre-wedding jitters. These kids just happened to be down at the Seaport, biking around and doing tricks. The second our photographer asked them to circle us, we were both so at ease. They swarmed us and were like, ‘Congrats! You look beautiful!’ We just looked at each other and knew we were ready, without even having to say it.” —Kara Becker, career counselor, and Jared Becker, finance associate, married November 2010

Photo: Stacey Ilyse

“This older couple was enjoying an afternoon in the park, looking at some of their old photos, and we just flung ourselves upon them. They had been married for more than 60 years, which made me a little teary-eyed. It seemed like good luck.” —Kate Williams, PR executive, and Dave Williams, advertising executive, married September 2010

Photo: Ira Fox/Gramercy Park Photo

“We were shooting in Tribeca and suddenly, this woman and her dog came out of nowhere. She blew right by us, but the dog stopped and looked up at me as if he knew he was imposing on something. I felt so bad for him with that thing around his neck.” —Lauren Andriano Barnet, psychologist, and Chris Barnet, commercial-real-estate finance adviser, married September 2011

Photo: Brian Dorsey Studios

“After our ceremony, my husband and I ran into a parade for Chinese New Year. People were setting off firecrackers and doing the lion dance. It was symbolic in a way—Chinese traditions were a big part of my upbringing—and great that we were able to capture both New York and China in our photos.” —Vanessa Guo, entrepreneur, and Charles Van Buren, media executive, married February 2010

Photo: Heather Waraksa

“We had just come out of City Hall on the first day of legalized gay marriage, and there was a receiving line of strangers, all applauding and saying congratulations. We felt like celebrities. We’re both kind of private, so it’s funny we chose to do this very public thing. I’m really grateful for that day and wouldn’t change a thing about it.” —Gisela Delgado (right), photo-studio manager, and Alena Riddick, executive assistant, married July 2011

Photo: Photo Pink

“It was a beautiful morning, and the Central Park Conservatory Garden was slowly beginning to populate. At one point we turned around, and there were these four little heads, like birds in a tree, looking at us. I think it was actually a bird-watching group. I started to laugh, and Dan just looked down. It felt a little bit like live theater.” —MaryLouise Napier, museum director, and Daniel Zuzunaga, senior strategist, married April 2007

Photo: Brian Dorsey Studios

“There was some kind of street fair going on in Dumbo, and we saw this outdoor ring with a chain-link fence around it. My wife was getting a little scared because one of the wrestlers started climbing to the top. They were pretty good, considering they were blindfolded.” —Tae Kim, management consultant, and Jade Marshall, retail manager, married September 2011

Photo: Michael Nagle for Kelly Guenther Studio

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York
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