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“I bought dress shoes for Gaetano, but he looked like a little old man; we swapped them for Converse. Fabiana wore a Philip Lim dress, blue shoes from Crewcuts, and a fascinator from Anthropologie. And she was really adamant about wearing lace gloves.”

Photo: Brian Dorsey Studios

“We had a confessional booth instead of a photo booth. I loved the idea of having a video of our friends and family speaking from the heart while slightly intoxicated.”

Photo: Brian Dorsey Studios

“The table settings were a conversation piece. I’m not a flower kind of girl, so we used terrariums, branches, and succulents, plus a few whimsical touches like a gold bunny in a glass vase and Fornasetti dishes.”

Photo: Brian Dorsey Studios

“The concept of everyone wearing the same dress wouldn’t have been appropriate for my bridesmaids; they’re just so different. They wore everything from Vera Wang to Jill Stuart, but somehow all ended up with pleating in their dresses. It was great to see everyone so comfortable.”

Photo: Brian Dorsey Studios

“I tried on something like 60 dresses but fell in love with this one by Selia Yang. The color had a vintage, antique feel. Zak knew from day one that he would have a bespoke suit—very British of him.”

Photo: Brian Dorsey Studios

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York

Slide Header

Address, date, or similar info here.

For me, the high point of the show is this, which manages simultaneously to be a painting, a force field, and an electromagnetic visual discharge. This is an artist sloughing off old consciousness, making something he doesn’t even know is art, giving up nearly all known languages of painting, and maybe violating the laws of nature by making something that seemingly puts off more energy than went into making it.

Photo: © 2010 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art, New York
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