MOST RECENT ARTICLES BY:

  1. streaming opera
    Streaming Now: The Metropolitan Opera’s Tristan und IsoldeA 2016 production with familiar tropes.
  2. coronavirus
    The New York Philharmonic, Closed Till September, Is Winding Down Musicians’ PaySalaries will be cut back gradually through May 31, and the summer is under negotiation.
  3. opera review
    Streaming Tonight: A Tale of Two Tones in the Met’s La TraviataMichael Mayer’s production makes the sparkly life so unsexy and over-sugared, the last act’s bleakness comes off as refreshingly spare.
  4. opera
    The Metropolitan Opera Is Furloughing Its Orchestra, Chorus, and TradesThey’ll retain health and instrument insurance, but not their salaries.
  5. coronavirus
    The Leader of the Free World Gives a Speech, and She Nails ItA speech with compassion and forthrightness — imagine that.
  6. vulture recommends
    The Best Operas You Should Stream While They’re FreeA week at the virtual Met Opera is a week without duds or off nights.
  7. cityscape
    How Real Architecture Inspired Westworld’s Futuristic CitiesThe meaning behind season three’s deluxe urban dystopia, agleam with prosperity and gentrified to a high polish.
  8. coronavirus
    Arts Organizations Are Heading Into Crisis. A Few Things Might Mitigate It.Performers and staff, already living close to the edge, have little margin for a long layoff.
  9. coronavirus
    Close the Theaters. Close the Opera. Close the Concert Halls. Now.Yes, it will be brutal to the performing-arts economy. It’s also necessary.
  10. coronavirus
    A Roman’s Account of Life Under Coronavirus LockdownIt’s an economic disaster, but there’s still a sense that the disease is someone else’s problem.
  11. cityscape
    The Sunnyside Yard Master Plan Is a Mirage of a Better CityNew York City’s plan for the city’s heart is the best of all worlds. Whether it can actually exist in ours is another question.
  12. cityscape
    Coronavirus Threatens Everything That Makes New York GreatThe city thrives on human entanglement. What happens if a pandemic drives its residents into isolation?
  13. cityscape
    Farm Livin’ Is the Life for Me, Ja? Rem Koolhaas Tries Out Country LifeFor “Countryside, the Future,” a city boy goes to the sticks.
  14. cityscape
    L.A.’s Beguiling Idea: An African-American Arts DestinationIn South Los Angeles—formerly known as South Central—Destination Crenshaw will be an elevated park amid the traffic arteries.
  15. opera review
    Opera Review: Great Voices and Coked-Up Staging in the Met’s AgrippinaJoyce DiDonato leads a cast that’s directed at a frantic pace.
  16. classical music
    Why I’d Rather Hear the Danish String Quartet Than Any Other FoursomeRange, musicality, sparkling technique without stony seriousness.
  17. cityscape
    Trump’s Classical-Architecture Edict Is Dumb — But Not Worth the OutrageIt’s boneheaded. But it doesn’t censor architects or stifle creativity in the country at large.
  18. music
    58 Minutes With the Omnivorous Composer Caroline ShawA composer of eclectic influences and twisty, back and forth scores (and, by the way, a Pulitzer winner).
  19. cityscape
    Every Plan to Fix Penn Station, RankedMore than 30 years’ worth of schemes, renderings, misfires, and good intentions.
  20. in conversation
    Frank Gehry Doesn’t Know How to RetireIn conversation with the most famous architect alive, who’s fully engaged and working nonstop as he turns 91.
  21. cityscape
    Eric Adams’s ‘Go Back to Iowa’ Is Intolerant — and IncoherentThe Brooklyn borough president implies that you’re not a New Yorker if you shop at chain stores. Tell it to the customers at your local Duane Reade.
  22. cityscape
    ‘Slum Clearance’ Tore Down Much More Than TenementsA new exhibition at the Center for Architecture documents the mid-century misfire of urban renewal.
  23. the lost canon
    It’s Time We All Heard the Music of Lili BoulangerOne of France’s great composers, she was ignored because she was a woman who died young.
  24. opera review
    Review: A Grungy, Glorious New Wozzeck at the MetWilliam Kentridge’s new production makes its debut.
  25. cityscape
    The Elemental Architecture of Jeanne GangA Chicago architect renowned for sublime engineering whose buildings really work for New Yorkers.
  26. cityscape
    A Transit Hub for an All-Corporate San Francisco FutureA public project that almost feels privatized.
  27. best of 2019
    The Best Classical-Music Performances of 2019A rough year for institutions, a great year for their music.
  28. cityscape
    Revealed: The Plans for David Geffen Hall and for the Music WithinA $500 million renovation that will finally fix that room. Maybe.
  29. cityscape
    The Brooklyn Botanic Garden Renovates, and Faces an Existential ThreatA new visitor center and Woodland Garden, and the long shadow of proposed high-rise neighbors.
  30. the future issue
    By 2029, a Hyperloop Could Turn Columbus, Ohio, Into a Suburb of ChicagoI’m intrigued but skeptical.
  31. opera review
    Gleaming and Self-Aware, Philip Glass’s Akhnaten Is Borne to the MetGilt is everywhere.
  32. cityscape
    Two New Buildings Break Free of the Glass StraitjacketFaçade materials that are able to show their age.
  33. classical music
    At Lincoln Center, Schumann Gets a Toughening-Up in ZauberlandA new piece reinterprets the songs of ‘Dichterliebe.’
  34. cityscape
    Does the Future of Public Housing Lie in These Cozy London Projects?Peter Barber’s cozy brickwork obliterates the usual concrete severity.
  35. art and architecture
    Two Critics — Art and Architecture — Compare Their New MoMA ExperiencesSaltz and Davidson on the newly expanded museum.
  36. cityscape
    Spending $9 Billion on New Architecture Will Not Solve the Rikers ProblemAttitudes toward crime and incarceration, rather than the physical place, are most of the problem.
  37. cityscape
    At Battersea Power Station, the Best We Could Hope for (in Both Senses)Yet another spectacular building becomes mixed-use luxury.
  38. cityscape
    The New MoMA Tries to Get Out of Its Own Way. We’ll See If It Can.An attempt to manage the crush of visitors that’s made the museum hard to love.
  39. accessibility
    The Important Thing I Didn’t See at the New Hunters Point LibraryTechnically, the great-looking new public library in Queens is ADA-compliant. But that doesn’t mean it’s fully accessible.
  40. cityscape
    Àlvaro Siza Vieira, an Architect’s Architect, Comes to TownA legend in the profession, little-known here, builds his first New York tower.
  41. #metoo
    Plácido Domingo Played Charming Rogues Onstage and a Monstrous One in PrivateOnstage at the Met, he was a persuasive bad guy. We were seeing more than we knew.
  42. opera review
    A Gorgeous Porgy and Bess, Its Flaws Intact, at the Metropolitan OperaAll those musical superpowers on the Met’s stage make Porgy as easy to love as it is hard to swallow.
  43. cityscape
    The Hunters Point Library Was Too Expensive, and Is Worth ItA small, great civic monument on the Queens waterfront.
  44. cityscape
    The Challenges of Constructing New York’s Tallest Apartment BuildingA conversation with the architects of the 131-story Central Park Tower.
  45. fall preview
    The Best Classical Music Performances to See This FallPorgy and Bess returns, Kelli O’Hara sings with the New York Philharmonic, and more.
  46. fall preview 2019
    Anthony Roth Costanzo Is the Pharaoh We NeedThe countertenor brings the sexually ambiguous monarch of Philip Glass’s Akhnaten to the Met.
  47. cityscape
    Red Tape Is Keeping New York City’s Landscape Stuck in the PastAn ambitious new plan to remake the Port Authority bus terminal highlights the extent to which the city’s balkanized bureaucracy stifles ambition.
  48. cityscape
    Steven Holl’s Subtle ‘Reach’ Humanizes the Kennedy CenterThe architect has managed to strike an impossible balance in his addition to the venerable icon.
  49. cityscape
    The Berkshires Have the Culture of a Major City — and New Architecture to MatchBig-city institutions amid the cow pastures.
  50. cityscape
    New Studies Say Gentrification Doesn’t Really Force Out Low-Income ResidentsIn part because it improves school integration, it may be better for lower-income residents than previously thought.
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