Displaying all articles tagged:

Doree Shafrir

  1. riveting trends
    Vajazzling: A Positive Economic Indicator We’d Rather Do WithoutAt first we thought people spackling their lady business might be a good thing. We have changed our minds.
  2. gossipmonger
    Jill Zarin Loses Approximately Twenty Pounds of BoobThe ‘Real Housewife’ got a breast reduction that a source said made her “feel twenty pounds lighter.” Plus more celebrity TMI, in our daily gossip roundup!
  3. in other news
    The ‘Observer’ Attempts to Part the GaysToday we learn that there are just two different types of young New York homosexual men — theater queens and everybody else.
  4. in other news
    Recent Ivy League Grads: Media GoldAn ‘Observer’ story today reminds us that we always seem to be reading shocking tales of graduates from elite schools having to do — gasp — hard work.
  5. ink-stained wretches
    Is the Traditional Magazine Writer Doomed? We Say No.The Observer thinks that no young writers want to work for magazines anymore; they only want to blog. We aggressively disagree.
  6. in other news
    Meet the RipstersThe trials and tribulations of buff nerddom.
  7. ink-stained wretches
    The ‘Observer’ Takes on Phil Gourevitch, Assistant EnvyIn today’s Observer profile about Phil Gourevitch, we learn a few things about the man’s tenure as new editor of the Paris Review. He’s handsome, he’s doing a great job, yadda yadda yadda. But the best thing we learned was about the profile’s author, scribe Doree Shafrir. She is really, really excited about the editorial assistants at the Paris Review under George Plimpton. Here how she waxes poetic, not about Plimpton himself, but about the glamorous lives of his aides and interns: Some, if not most, of the magazine’s appeal never had anything to do with what was actually in the magazine; it was about the idea of the magazine, the mystique associated with it as a place where young lovers of literature, most of whom were the well-groomed and well-mannered graduates of the nation’s elite colleges, could apprentice for a year, or more, after college, and attend some glamorous parties in exchange for reading through the slush pile.