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Home > Restaurants > Hao Noodle and Tea by Madam Zhu's Kitchen

Hao Noodle and Tea by Madam Zhu's Kitchen

Critic's Pick Critics' Pick

401 Sixth Ave., New York, NY 10014 40.733505 -74.002215
nr. W. 8th St.  See Map | Subway Directions Hopstop Popup
212-633-8900 Send to Phone

  • Cuisine: Chinese
  • Price Range: $$$

    Key to Prices and ratings

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    • Good
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  • Critics' Rating: ***

    Key to Prices and ratings

    Upscale
    • Almost Perfect
    • Exceptional
    • Generally Excellent
    • Very Good
    • Good
    Cheap Eats
    • Best in Category
    • Excellent
    • Delicious
    • Very Good
    • Noteworthy
    • Very Expensive
    • Expensive
    • Moderate
    • Cheap
  • Reader Rating: Write a Review
Photo by Melissa Hom

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Official Website

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Hours

Sun-Thurs, 11:30am-2:15pm and 5:30pm-9:30pm; Fri-Sat, 11:30am-2:15pm and 5:30pm-10pm

Prices

$8-$26

Payment Methods

American Express, MasterCard, Visa

Special Features

  • Good for Groups
  • Lunch
  • Take-Out
  • Tea Time
  • Family Style
  • Design Standout
  • Reservations Not Required
  • Catering

Alcohol

  • No Alcohol

Reservations

Accepted/Not Necessary

Profile

For the ultimate in postmillennial Chinese-themed dining, you won’t do better than the somewhat tortuously named West Village establishment Hao Noodle and Tea by Madam Zhu’s Kitchen, which landed amid the jumble of storefronts and tattoo parlors along Sixth Avenue like a kind of buffet-laden spacecraft sent directly from the sprawling restaurant scene in Beijing. The eponymous proprietor, Zhu Rong, runs a popular restaurant in the Chinese capital, as it happens, along with others in culinary hot spots like Shanghai, Hangzhou, and her native Chongqing, and unlike other Chinese chefs in New York and around the USA, who focus traditionally on one style of provincial cooking, she has a keen understanding of the country’s evolving, pan-regional tastes. Everything on the carefully edited, seasonally attuned, judiciously priced menu is exceptional, but pay special attention to the noodle section, which tastes like a greatest-hits tour of the street stalls of China’s famous night markets, and to the complex and flavorful soups and stews, which are as different from your standard-issue carryout variety of hot-and-sour soup, say, as a “deli style” corned-beef sandwich in Beijing is from the real thing.

Ideal Meal

Chinese chives with clams, Le Shan chicken, “sweetly smoked” sole, dan dan and/or scallion noodles with dried shrimp, seared beef medallions with walnuts and/or roasted Cantonese chicken, seafood rice and/or tomato rice stew, taro soup.

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