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The 9 Very Best Weighted Blankets

“They feel like being swaddled or held in a firm hug.”

blue weighted blanket on top of bed with yellow sheets and white pillows inside a bedroom - strategist best weighted blanket
Photo: Marcus McDonald
blue weighted blanket on top of bed with yellow sheets and white pillows inside a bedroom - strategist best weighted blanket
Photo: Marcus McDonald

In this article

If you struggle with falling — or staying — asleep, a weighted blanket can be a low-tech option to help you enjoy a better night’s slumber. That’s because the added weight of one can aid “reduce anxiety and promote feelings of relaxation, which can help you fall asleep faster,” says Logan Foley, a certified sleep science coach and managing editor at Sleep Foundation. Plus, weighted blankets are just really comforting. Think of the pressure that an X-ray vest at the dentist’s office provides, but cozier — and without the harrowing dental procedure that usually comes with it. Or, as David Rubin, a certified sleep-science coach and director of product testing at the Sleep Doctor, explains it: “Weighted blankets offer evenly distributed weight, which creates a feeling of being swaddled or held in a firm hug, which can increase serotonin that influences how long and how well you sleep.” When I got my first weighted blanket a year ago, I was skeptical of its calming properties, as I’ve always (thankfully) been a good sleeper. But now that I’ve tried a couple and settled on one that works for me, I crave that soothing heaviness at night, particularly during the winter. For the uninitiated, picking the best weighted blanket for your individual needs might seem a bit tricky, as they weigh anywhere from five to 35 pounds and come in a variety of styles and materials. To help you out, I tested options and also consulted 11 experts to bring you the best weighted blankets for every budget and sleep preference.

What we’re looking for

Weight

Weighted blankets come in a variety of different materials and knits, which I’ll get to below, but the most important factor when shopping for a weighted blanket is the weight, says Foley. Dr. Raj Dasgupta, sleep specialist and clinical associate professor of medicine at the University of Southern California’s Keck School of Medicine, advises buyers to choose a weighted blanket that comes in at about 8 to 12 percent of the user’s body weight. Sleep specialist Dr. Brandon Peters gives this example: “For an adult who weighs 200 pounds, a 20-pound blanket would be appropriate.” Any heavier and the blanket will be more uncomfortable than soothing. In our experience, most blankets weigh between 10 and 25 pounds, but occasionally you’ll see a mere five-pounder or a hefty one up to 35 pounds. As Keith Cushner, the executive director of product testing at Sleep Foundation, put it, “As long as you get the weight right, you’ll enjoy a weighted blanket.” Relatedly, all the blankets come in a range of sizes, from ones meant for use by one person or those that can be used across a bed for two.

Material

Much like comforters, material comes down to personal preference. Over the years, manufacturers have come out with more options in terms of colors and style, Cushner says, from knitted blankets to ones that look like standard comforters with duvet covers, so you can choose what works best for you.

Sweaty sleepers may think they’ll forever be excluded from the weighted blanket club because, to state the obvious, weighted blankets are, well, a heavy layer and can feel very warm. However, there are a few out there that can actually feel cool during sleep. Made from materials like Tencel and bamboo, these versions tend to be more lightweight and temperature-regulating than their polyester or flannel counterparts. (For more specifics, I rounded up a bunch of cooling options here.)

Filling

Weighted blankets are most commonly filled with plastic, glass, or steel beads; grains; beans; or even sand. Occasionally, they have no filling and get their weight from the hefty fabric. As I wrote in the companion story on the best cooling weighted blankets, glass beads, besides being more environmentally friendly than plastic, are a bit more cooling than other fillings. Whatever the filling, to make sure it won’t shift over time, it needs to be sewn into quilted squares or somehow made to stay in place. Even distribution is key to a functional weighted blanket; it won’t work quite as well if all the filling falls to one end.

Maintenance

As far as how durable they are, Cushner says that weighted blankets “hold up as long as they look good,” like any regular, non-weighted blankets. Most of them come with removable covers that can be machine-washed, and even knit blankets can, per some manufacturers, go in the laundry.

Best weighted blanket overall

Weight: 10, 15, 20, and 25 pounds | Material: Available in Tencel lyocell, organic cotton, and velvet jumbo yarn | Filling: Chunky knit | Maintenance: Machine washable

Longtime Strategist readers shouldn’t be surprised to find the Bearaby weighted blanket at the top of our list. (It’s also our top choice for the best overall cooling weighted blanket, a favorite of Strategist staffers, and is even celebrity-approved.) What makes it unique is that unlike other weighted blankets, the Bearaby doesn’t have a filling. Instead, it’s hand knit with thick, chunky layers that create the heft without added weight. And thanks to the open-knit construction, it’s inherently breathable, a boon to hot sleepers. It’s arguably the best-looking weighted blanket out there, too, resembling something cozy as opposed to therapeutic.

I tested a 15-pounder and found it to be extremely comforting and calming. I put it over my comforter during colder months and felt cozy and “pressed down” in a way that instantly put me to sleep. It’s admittedly harder to move around underneath it, because it’s so heavy, but that contributed to a deeper sleep. I will note that because of its construction, it’s a bit cumbersome to store and carry, and the loops require adjusting from time to time, so you’ll want to keep that in mind. Senior editor Jen Trolio, who has owned the velvet version for nearly three years and has given others as gifts, was first drawn to its look and is now “all in” on the Bearaby, though she notes that the “chunkiness can be an issue” for some, especially if you’re sharing a bed with someone. The Bearaby is available in 10-, 15-, 20-, and 25-pound weights and comes in three materials (organic cotton, Tencel, and velvet), though it should be noted that not all materials encompass the full range of sizes. Bearaby also offers the nicest and broadest color options, including lavender, driftwood, eggplant, and jade, depending on the style. As far as maintenance goes, it’s machine washable, but Trolio notes that it takes a while to dry.

Best starter weighted blanket

Weight: 5, 7, 12, 15, 17, 20, 25, 30 pounds | Material: Cotton, nylon, or microfiber | Filling: Glass beads | Maintenance: Machine washable

If you’re looking to dip your toe into the world of weighted blankets, consider ones from YnM, which, unlike Bearaby, are filled with glass beads (and are the more traditional style of weighted blanket), more affordable, and might be a little easier to wrangle than a chunky knit. An Amazon bestseller, it comes in the largest range of weights on this list, from 5 to 30 pounds, and in different materials including cotton, nylon, and microfiber. It’s a favorite of Strategist associate editor Jenna Milliner-Waddell, who has owned the cotton weighted blanket since 2019. She defines her life “pre–YnM blanket and post–YnM blanket.” “Pre-YnM, it took me what felt like forever to fall asleep. My post-YnM sleep life, though, is very different,” she writes. “Using the blanket, I couldn’t tell you how long it takes me to fall asleep, because I’m actually sleeping instead of having nightly staring contests with my ceiling.” It’s made of seven layers and is filled with glass beads that are distributed between 4.7” x 4.7” pockets.

YnM labels the blanket as cooling because of its many layers of breathable fabric and glass beads. But Milliner-Waddell clarifies, saying, “lying under it doesn’t feel like an ice bath, but as someone who sleeps hot, I will say using the blanket doesn’t make me any hotter, even on warmer nights.” As far as durability goes, after owning it for three years, Milliner-Waddell says that it’s “held up great, with no tears or staining, and all the beads are still in the right spot.” It comes in a bunch of fun colors, like sky blue and avocado, and cute patterns, depending on the size and material. While the instructions say that the entire blanket is machine washable (it does not come with a cover), reviews on Amazon are mixed on whether that’s a good idea. Your best bet would be to get a separate removable duvet cover so you have to wash the actual blanket less.

Best cotton weighted blanket

From $199

Weight: 12, 15, 20, 25 pounds | Material: Cotton | Filling: Glass beads | Maintenance: Machine washable

For those looking for a traditional weighted blanket covered in cotton, Baloo makes a very nice one that comes in throw, full/queen, and king sizes, the latter two which allow you to share one with a partner. Trolio uses the Bearaby on herself, but when she wants to cover the entire bed with a weighted blanket so that her husband could experience it as well, she opts for the queen-size Baloo. “For actual beds and especially in partner scenarios, the glass beads are nice for a sleeker, slimmer look,” she says, adding that knits are better as a throw. Because she prefers to “sleep under the equivalent of a pile of bricks,” Trolio pairs the queen with a 12-pound throw on her size for extra weight. Even with the double layer, the bed still looks neat, and she’s not burning up under them, either. The cotton itself feels “very smooth, possibly even sateen-y,” says Trolio.

When former Strategist senior writer Karen Iorio Adelson tested the blanket, she reported that it was comfortable for a hot sleeper like herself. “I felt cooler sleeping under the Baloo than most of the other blankets,” she says. While not specifically labeled “cooling,” the cotton material actually plays a huge part in the breathability of the Baloo. “We sleep more deeply in a cool environment. Heat loss and temperature regulation often occur from our feet at night. This is why people may kick their feet out from under the covers at night,” explains Peters, adding, “A material like cotton is more breathable, allowing for natural cooling.” The blanket has a thin profile, further contributing to its comfort, and the glass beads help with airflow because they’re not as tightly packed. It’s also machine washable.

Best (less-expensive) cotton weighted blanket

Weight: 5, 7, 12, 15, 17, 20, 25, 30 pounds | Material: Cotton | Filling: Glass beads | Maintenance: Hand wash

Here’s a more affordable cotton option from ZonLi that comes in as many weight options as the YnM. Former Strategist writer Chloe Anello finds it particularly durable. “After four years of constant use, it doesn’t look worn, and the beads stay in place throughout the night thanks to the quilting stitches on the blanket,” she says. If you’re concerned about its breathability Joe Auer, the founder of sleep-product review site Mattress Clarity, thinks it’s among the cooler-sleeping weighted blankets because it’s made from 100 percent cotton, and the glass beads it’s filled with allow for some airflow. If you want to wash the blanket, the manufacturer recommends hand-washing it or using a separate removable duvet cover.

Best velvet weighted blanket

Weight: 12 and 20 pounds | Material: Cotton velvet | Filling: Glass beads | Maintenance: Dry clean

If you’re going for something a little more luxe, Cushner recommends the weighted blanket by Saatva, which makes one of our favorite mattresses. Unlike the polyester velvet you find in many other blankets, this is composed of 100 percent organic cotton velvet, lending it a more upscale feel. The diamond quilting prevents the glass bead filling from shifting, which helps keep pressure evenly distributed throughout the night. It comes in only two weights, but it’s a great choice for those who would like to have something a bit more elevated that looks more like a regular blanket for their bedroom.

Best (less expensive) velvet weighted blanket

Comma Home Minky Weighted Blanket
From $70
From $70

Weight: 15 and 20 pounds | Material: Polyester from recycled water bottles | Filling: Glass beads | Maintenance: Machine washable, but spot clean recommended

This velvety weighted blanket is a fraction of the price of the Saatva and also comes highly recommended by the Sleep Doctor’s Rubin. It’s made from polyester that’s manufactured from recycled water bottles, which accounts for the lower price, but that doesn’t make it any less comfortable. In fact, Rubin likes it because it’s “incredibly soft and cozy,” and the brand calls it “Minky.” It’s filled with glass beads and comes in two weights (15 and 20 pounds) with 14 duvet loops so you can secure it to your favorite duvet cover. It’s machine washable, and while the instructions recommend spot cleaning, Rubin says that it “holds up well even after multiple washes.”

Best bamboo weighted blanket

Weight: 5, 7, 10, 12, 15, 17, 20 pounds | Material: Bamboo viscose | Filling: Glass beads | Maintenance: Machine washable

Here’s a weighted blanket that’s made of bamboo viscose that Ben Trapskin, founder of Sleep Sherpa, has been using for the past year. “It is one of the smoothest-feeling weighted blankets I have used,” he says, thanks to the bamboo fabric cover that, according to him, “has a silky feel and helps keep you cool.” The glass-bead-filled blanket incorporates layers of microfiber, which Trapskin says “gives it a more consistent feel, more like a regular blanket.” The extra padding “makes it so that you don’t hear the glass beads shifting when you move,” he adds. Another feature he calls out is the fact that it comes with a travel case. Because of it, “It’s easier to fold and put away than other weighted blankets I have used.” It’s machine washable, but you can buy a separate cover for added protection.

Best (less expensive) chunky knit weighted blanket

From $199

Weight: 10 and 15 pounds | Material: Polyester jersey knit | Filling: Chunky knit | Maintenance: Spot clean only

If you like the idea of a knitted weighted blanket like Bearaby but want to save a few bucks, consider Nolah’s version, which Trolio also tested. “It’s a very solid entry-level weighted blanket if you are going for the ‘chunky knit’ look,” says Trolio. That’s because she says it has a “tighter weave” than the Bearaby, which helps it “hold its shape much better and isn’t as snaggable.” Unlike the Bearaby, however, it only comes in two colors (cream and grey) and two weights (ten and 15 pounds), and it cannot be machine-washed, only spot-cleaned. But the price point is much friendlier at $50 less for the 15-pound size.

Best cozy weighted blanket

Weight: 10 pounds | Material: Polyester sherpa fleece | Filling: Glass beads | Maintenance: Machine washable

Most of the weighted blankets on this list are covered in materials that are cool to the touch, or breathable, thanks to their knit construction. If you want something cozier, consider this double-sided sherpa fleece throw that weighs just ten pounds. It’s plush, soft, and not too heavy, and I found it great for cuddling with on the sofa while still feeling a nice amount of pressure. In the winter, I use it as a blanket under my top sheet and comforter, and despite feeling cozy, I never get too hot. It’s also easy to fold up and put away — unlike the Bearaby, which can be difficult to store given its chunk factor.

Testing the Luna weighted blanket, with a close-up on the sherpa texture. Photo: Lauren Ro

Some more bedding essentials we’ve written about

Our experts

• Karen Iorio Adelson, former Strategist senior writer
• Chloe Anello, former Strategist writer
• Joe Auer, founder of Mattress Clarity
• Keith Cushner, executive director of product testing at Sleep Foundation
Dr. Raj Dasgupta, assistant professor of clinical medicine at the University of Southern California’s Keck School of Medicine
• Logan Foley, certified sleep science coach and managing editor of Sleep Foundation
• Jenna Milliner-Waddell, Strategist associate editor
• Robert Pagano, co-founder of Sleepline
Dr. Brandon Peters, sleep specialist
• David Rubin, director of product testing at the Sleep Doctor
• Jen Trolio, Strategist senior editor

Additional reporting by Chloe Anello

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The 9 Very Best Weighted Blankets